Measuring our performance

Percentage points explanation tables

1 Governance
1.1 Governance, information and engagement
Measure Actual difference/
Difference in % points*
Explanation
Residents (%) who are satisfied or neutral (neither satisfied nor dissatisfied) with regard to their involvement with decision-making (16) Engagement and consultation on Island Bay Cycleway project impacted on the perception the public has on Council’s decision making process. Council has acknowledged that we could do better in this area and is addressing this issue by re-engaging with the Island Bay community on the cycleway project.
Council and committee agendas (%) that are made available to elected members five days prior to the meeting and to the public four days prior to the meeting 11 Performance against this measure has improved tremendously as we have put systems in place for our staff to meet this measure.
1.2 Māori and mana whenua partnerships
Māori residents (%) who are satisfied or neutral (neither satisfied nor dissatisfied) with regard to their involvement with decision-making (10) This year our satisfaction rating dropped a few points. This is a process of engagement and we need to work harder to ensure that Māori are engaged in decision-making.
2 Environment
2.1 Gardens, beaches, and green open spaces
Measure Actual difference/
Difference in % points*
Explanation
Number of visitors to the Botanic Gardens (including Otari-Wilton’s Bush) (132,933) Attendance counters have been made ineffective at times as insects build nests within them causing the counters not to work. With the cruise ship season and summer we just had it should have been well over 1.2m.
2.3 Water
Median response time for:attendance for urgent call outsresolution for urgent call outsattendance for non-urgent call outsresolution for non-urgent call 10 Mins
1.2 Hours
7.3 Hours
13.1 Days
This is a new indicator as mandated by the DIA, with data collection having commenced in the last financial year. According to year end actual the maintenance contractor is preforming better in this indicator than the target. With the limited data currently available, it is difficult to predict or update the annual target at this stage.
Number of unplanned supply cuts per 1,000 connections 2.8/1000 Year-end figure is less than the target due to the low number of unplanned supply cuts in the network. The result for this KPI depends on the amount of reactive work on the water network, the level of which is subject to many variables such as pipe materials & age, ground movement, traffic loading, soil condition etc.
2.4 Wastewater
Number of wastewater reticulation incidents per km of reticulation pipeline (blockages) 0.63 Year-end figure is less than the target due to the low number of pipeline (blockages) in the network. Results for this KPI depend on pipe blockages in the wastewater network which cannot be easily predicted.
Dry weather wastewater overflows/1,000 connections* 55 There have been 37 dry weather network overflows, 33 due to blockages (including one on a private sewage pipe), two due to a broken sewer main, one due to a private property leak and one due to stream erosion under a manhole. One overflow occurred at the Moa Point Treatment Plant in September due to a power failure. Work on capacity and demand issues is continuing across the network through investigations, planning, maintenance and upgrades. Network Dry Weather overflows: 37 Treatment plant Dry Weather overflows: 1 Total: 38 Total nr of connections: 69030 (WCC rating database)Therefore – 38/69030*1000= .055.
Median response time for wastewater overflows:
(a) attendance time
(b) resolution time*


0.27 Hours
3.65 Hours
These are new indicators as mandated by the DIA, with data collection having commenced in the last financial year. According to YE actuals, maintenance contractor is preforming better in these indicators than the targets. With the limited data currently available, it is difficult to predict or update the annual targets at this stage.
2.5 Stormwater
Number of pipeline blockages per km of pipeline 0.46 Year-end figure is less than the target mainly due to the low number of stormwater reticulation incidents per km of reticulation pipeline (blockages) in the network. Results for this KPI are mainly dependent on pipe blockages which cannot be easily predicted. This result indicates that the storm water network is performing better than the targets.
Median response time to attend a flooding event 11 Mins Year-end figure is less than the target mainly due to the low number of stormwater reticulation incidents per km of reticulation pipeline (blockages) in the network. Results for this KPI are mainly dependent on pipe blockages which cannot be easily predicted. This result indicates that the stormwater network is performing better than the target.
Percentage of days during the bathing season (1 November to 31 March) that the monitored beaches are suitable for recreational use 10 Year-end result indicates that our beaches are fully compliant for recreational use during the bathing season.
2.6 Conservation attractions
Zoo - total admissions 26,096 A positive variance resulting from great summer weather and a strong response to the opening of Meet the Locals He Tuku Aroha.
Zealandia - visitors 29,902 2015/16 was a good year for international visitors to Wellington and the long warm summer contributed to an overall uplift in Zealandia’s visitation. The visitation performance also reflects a coordinated improvement in Zealandia’s membership, its appeal as an education facility and its growing appeal to locals and visitors to Wellington.
3 Economic Development
3.1 City promotions
Measure Actual difference/
Difference in % points*
Explanation
Estimated attendance at WCC supported events 478,188 Attendance from Capital 150 celebrations (91k), Edinburgh **Tattoo (84k), Elton John (28k) and NZ Festival (95k) have pushed attendance above what was targeted.
4 Cultural Wellbeing
4.1 Arts and culture activities
Measure Actual difference/
Difference in % points*
Explanation
Economic contribution ($) the NZ Festival makes to the city’s economy (direct new spend) (7,907,100) The reported economic impact does not include the Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo, which was presented by the Festival ahead of the NZ Festival and attracted 55,000 out of region visitors. Many out of region visitors chose the Tattoo over events within the main NZ Festival programme, which impacted on the NZ Festival’s out of region attendance and therefore economic impact. One in six people surveyed indicated they chose the Tattoo at the expense of a NZ Festival event. The Edinburgh Military Tattoo was presented by the NZ festival as a separate event from the actual NZ festival itself so this is reported as part of the activities of the NZ festival for the last financial year through WREDA but they are considered separate events. As they were separate events this impacted the out of region attendance and the economic benefit to the city as one in 6 people surveyed said they chose the Tattoo over an event in the NZ festival itself, which then led to the NZ festival itself having a smaller benefit than previous as the tattoo had benefit that was not included in the NZ festival result.
Cultural grants - % first time applicants who are successful (12) Due to high demand on the Arts and Culture Fund more high quality applications from previous applicants were successful, the fund has been increased in 2016/17 by $120,000 to meet increased demand.
5 Social and Recreation
5.1 Recreation promotion and support
Measure Actual difference/
Difference in % points*
Explanation
User (%) satisfaction - sportsfields (including artificial sports fields) (43) With the investment and provision of artificial surfaces alongside natural turf users expect a higher level of quality and availability. There is a conflict over the use of grass vs artificial fields for training vs competition which creates pressure on scheduling, resource and satisfaction. The variability of environmental conditions outside of our control can impact users, which can also impact satisfaction.
Visits to facilities – recreation centres and ASB Centre 27,573 The change in numbers has come about because the ASB Sports Centre numbers (which had been separately recorded) have been included from 2015/16. Prior to that ASB was counted separately. The decision was made to include both the community recreation centres and ASB Centre together going forward.
Artificial sportsfields % utilisation – peak winter (12) For winter 2015 we didn’t meet the peak target due to the lack of use on our turfs late in the evenings on Sat/Sun between approx. 7pm – 9.30pm. There was less use on the Wakefield artificial in April due to a car accident which hit our power box affecting all the lights, so there were less trainings happening in the evening.
Artificial sportsfields % utilisation – off-peak winter (10) For winter 2015 off-peak there was a large percentage increase in July’s use due to a number of football holidays programmes happening during the school holidays. For the other months the use was similar to winter 2014. Due to the unpredictable weather and costs primary schools are reluctant to make bookings in winter on the turfs.
Artificial sportsfields % utilisation – off-peak summer (10) There is little interest from customers to use the artificials during summer time as schools have their own fields. With Alex Moore now added to the mix it means we have more hours available which we struggle to fill during summer off-peak weekdays.
5.2 Community support
E-library users satisfaction (%) with the online library collection 10 This is an increase mainly in the area of online journals and databases, which suggests customers overall satisfaction with the online collection increased when we purchased Zinio. This is a composite figure as the average satisfaction of eBooks, eAudio, website, Databases/journals, and for the first time eTutorials.
Proportion of outcomes delivered (previous projects) - weighted by $ value 10 Following review in processes and subsequent improvements – the outcomes agreed to as part of funding agreements are realistic and achievable hence increase in proportion of outcomes achieved.
Libraries - website visits 1,309,967 This figure now includes website visitors via the library app, which is a statistic that was not able to be collected when the target was originally set.
6.0 Urban Development
6.1 Urban planning, heritage and public spaces development (including waterfront development)
Measure Actual difference/
Difference in % points*
Explanation
Residents (%) who agree their local suburban centre is lively and attractive (13) We continue to work on projects such as BIDs with residents to ensure lively and attractive suburban centres.
The proportion of grant funds successfully allocated (through milestones being met) (31) The Built Heritage Incentive Fund supports seismic strengthening and conservation projects, grants are typically a small percentage contribution to overall costs and are paid up to 18 months after grants are offered, all outcomes may not be achieved by the time a building project has been completed, where outcomes are not achieved funds are returned to the pool for reallocation.
7.0 Transport
7.1 Transport
Measure Actual difference/
Difference in % points*
Explanation
Residents’ satisfaction (%) with street lighting in suburban areas (21) WCC is reliant on the electricity network. We have experienced several network failures that contributed to light failures. During the upgrade of Victoria St long term failures in the network occurred. Where light failures occur we upgrade to new LED lights that are more reliable.
7.2 Parking
On-street car park turn-over rates - weekdays and weekends Weekdays (0.7)

Weekends (0.5)
Parking activity has seen an increase and this has had a negative impact on turnover rates.
On-street car park compliance - time restrictions and payment   Due to the piloting and subsequent installation of parking sensors we do not need to collect this data. Going forward new measure(s) will be developed relating to the parking sensors.