Statements of Service Provision

1 Governance
​Pārongo ā-tāone

Delivering trust and confidence in decision-making

BY THE NUMBERS

141,904

Number of registered voters in Wellington City. This is an increase from 136, 390 in 2013.

Governance – at a glance

Outcomes Connected-city People-centred city Eco-city Dynamic-city
Relevant LTP objectives

“Investing to grow” through establishing a programme of major projects that grow the economy and deliver returns on investment;

Investing to maintain and improve existing services, including making infrastructure more resilient and the city’s transport system more efficient;

Increasing the use of existing assets rather than spending on new infrastructure;

Improving asset management practices to better manage risk and the timing of asset replacement; and

Achieving ongoing efficiencies from shared services and improved customer experiences.

LTP key activities Governance, information and engagement. Māori and mana whenua partnerships.
Relevant LTP projects Governing the Region; A partnership approach; Involving residents in decision-making; Māori and Mana Whenua Partnerships.
Operational expenditure Operational expenditure (as per financial summary).

Good governance (which is democratic decision-making on behalf of our community) and informed engagement with our community are the foundations of the successful achievement of our outcomes. Good governance, informing and listening to residents so we can make decisions that are in the city’s best interests, and managing our partnerships with mana whenua (and other groups) ensure we have a local democracy. They also ensure we make quality decisions regarding the activities needed to achieve our outcomes. Our aim is to build trust and confidence in our decisions and delivery.

1.1
Governance, information and engagement
Pārongo, kōrerorero whānui me ngā mahi whakataunga

We want to involve people, and maintain their confidence, in our decision-making

We want our information and services to be accessible to our residents

What we do and why

The Local Government Act 2002, sets out the decision-making, planning and accountability procedures expected of us. Our decisions need to reflect the services that matter to the community and how much they are willing to pay for them. We need to ensure people are well-informed and can contribute meaningfully to Council decision-making processes. The Public Records Act 2005, requires us to keep a record of our work and provides access to the information we hold. City Archives preserves and makes available a huge range of primary information about the city’s history.

Our key activities include:

These activities are the foundation to the achievement of all our outcomes, and in particular contribute to the following outcome:

Outcome Outcome statement
People-centred city
  • Enhances trust and confidence in civic decision-making and encourages the community to participate in how the city is run
  • Providing information about the city and its services allows people to use the city’s facilities and provides access to information
  • Our City Archives is a guardian of Wellington’s memory. It preserves and makes available a huge range of primary information about the city’s history

Our key achievements

We enhanced trust and confidence in civic decision making and encouraged the community to participate in how the city is run

Engaging and informing the public are our core business and e-governance continued to be a key focus in 2015/16. With live-streaming of Council meetings now well-established, elected members can now use an audio-visual link to take part in Council meetings.

To help residents to participate in how we run the city we introduced an electronic process that speeds up the production of Council and Committee agendas and minutes. However, for the first time since 2013/14 we have not met our 2 working day target. This was because an agenda was delayed to accommodate a late application for a temporary road closure and the issue could not be postponed to the following monthly Council meeting.

Measure 2015/16 Actual Performance 2015/16 Target
Percentage of Council and Committee agendas made available to the public within statutory timeframes (2 working days). 94%
Did not achieve
100%
2014/15 Performance
100%

Source: Democratic Services

It is also now possible for residents to participate in Council and Committee meetings electronically. During the year we received six ePetitions and 129 people participated.

While we didn’t meet our target for residents satisfied with the level of consultation, this rating was the same as last year.

Measure 2015/16 Actual Performance 2015/16 Target
Percentage of residents satisfied with level of consultation 53%
Did not achieve
55%
2014/15 Performance
53%

Source: WCC Residents’ Monitoring Survey

There was also significant decline in resident’s satisfaction with their involvement in our decision making.

Measure 2015/16 Actual Performance 2015/16 Target
Percentage of residents satisfied with their involvement in Council decision-making 59%
Did not achieve
75%
2014/15 Performance
74%

Source: WCC Residents’ Monitoring Survey

We will look further into these residents satisfaction with their involvement in decision-making. Our Customer Strategy currently under development will also help address this.

We provided information about the city and its services allowing people to use the city’s facilities and have access to information

Our Service Centre continues to be the physical face of Council – but we also respond through a variety of mediums including face-to-face, emails, phone calls, text messages and on-line. Our residents and customers don’t get stuck in call queues with over 80 % of them being quickly redirected within the business.

Measure 2015/16 Actual Performance 2015/16 Target
Contact Centre calls answered in 30 seconds 80%
Improved performance
80%
2014/15 Performance
84%

Source: WCC Contact Centre

Our FIXiT smart phone app improves our residents’ access to our services. There has been an increase in the number of FIXiT notifications received over the year which maybe a response to the work we undertook to improve the profile of this channel. During 2015/16 we responded to 289,200 calls, 21,190 emails and 12,328 texts using our FIXiT app.

The number of residents who agree our information is easy to access has improved over the year but we have yet to achieve our target. Further work is under way to improve this.

Measure 2015/16 Actual Performance 2015/16 Target
Percentage of residents who agree that Council information is easy to access 49%
Did not achieve
55%
2014/15 Performance
48%

Source: WCC Residents’ Monitoring Survey

Our City Archives preserved and made available a huge range of primary information about the city’s history.

We improved the way we met our legislative obligations to preserve and make available information through our new DigiHub centre.

Case study

DigiHub, City Archives

Over the year we made significant progress in the digitisation of Council-held information. Digitisation reduces damage to our historic records, such as building permits, and makes it easier for the public (who previously had to visit our City Archives building) to access this historical information. It is one of the ways we’re moving towards becoming an electronic and paperless office.

In July 2015 City Archives introduced a new Building Consent Search Service. This allows the public to request and receive building consent information through our website for any property in the Council area for a fixed fee.

In early 2016 we set up a dedicated digitisation hub (DigiHub) and now respond to internal and external information requests in digital form. The result is our customers have timely access to our information, as do our staff who can access information through our content management system (TROVE). Since going live on 4 April 2016, DigiHub has prepped and scanned around 3750 files and created just under 240,000 pages of information. This is only 0.5% of all the items City Archives holds. We continue to receive positive feedback about this new service, as the process saves time and gives customers a complete record of a property.

“I’d just like to congratulate WCC for implementing the new service for downloading property files (building consent archive plans etc….) and providing a service to burn these direct to CD and courier out to the purchaser. As architects we used to have to spend large amounts of time coming down to WCC archives to review the files, when we really just want all the information available, and then to be able to filter and review it back at our own office, and to be able to go back and review portions of the existing information in future, to make sure we have not missed anything. This new service was fast, efficient and saved us a great deal of time. Thanks, WCC.” (Name withheld)

“Just to let you know, we are pretty impressed with the new download method of receiving archive documentation. Very large files have come through with no hiccups and it’s very helpful to have all the miscellaneous file information included.” (Name withheld)

“The new electronic delivery of archived consent info is a huge step forward.” (Name withheld)

Our performance

Quality of the public’s involvement in Council decision-making: We didn’t meet our targets for residents’ satisfaction with the level of consultation and their involvement with decision-making. The percentage of residents satisfied with the level of consultation was the same as last year. The percentage satisfied with their involvement in decision-making was lower than last year. Implementation of our Customer Strategy and new approaches to engagement should help us improve these satisfaction ratings in future.

Quality and timeliness of residents’ access to information: We didn’t meet our target for residents who agree Council information is easy to access although there was a slight improvement from last year. In addition, we didn’t meet our target for the percentage of residents who agree our website is easy to navigate and get information from. Again there was a decline in our performance from last year. We will consider how to address better access to our website and Council information in the future.

Further information can be found in the section ‘Measuring our Performance’.

Finances

How it was funded

Services in this activity are funded mostly through non-targeted rates, with a small portion funded through fees and user charges for Civic Information and City Archives.

What it cost 2015/16

Operating
Expenditure
($000) 
Actual
2016
Budget
2016
Variance
2016
Actual
2015
1.1.1 City Governance and Engagement 1        
Expenditure 9,433 9,901 468 9,181
Revenue (29) (12) 17 (106)
Net Expenditure 9,404 9,889 485 9,075
1.1.2 Civic Information 2        
Expenditure 5,334 5,435 101 5,364
Revenue (569) (313) 256 (387)
Net Expenditure 4,765 5,122 357 4,977
1.1.3 City Archives 3        
Expenditure 1,207 1,758 551 1,194
Revenue (153) (182) (29) (162)
Net Expenditure 1,054 1,576 522 1,032
 Capital Expenditure ($000) Actual
2016
Budget
2016
Variance
2016
Actual
2015
1.1.1 City Governance and Engagement        
Expenditure - - - -
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward N/A - - N/A

1Under budget due to savings in internal costs regarding the elected members and marketing costs associated with Our Wellington programme.
2Under budget due to higher internal labour recoveries which also drove lower organisational cost allocations.
3Under budget due to lower than planned personnel and asset purchasing costs.

1.2
Māori and mana whenua partnerships
Whai wāhitanga Māori (tae noa ki te mana whenua)
Top

We have an obligation to ensure the views of mana whenua are heard

What we do and why

We recognise our obligations under the Treaty of Waitangi, and our responsibilities under the Local Government Act 2002, by fostering partnerships with mana whenua (local iwi) and relationships with the wider community.

We ensure the special position of mana whenua Ngāti Toa Rangatira and Taranaki Whānui ki te Upoko o te Ika is acknowledged and reflected in the way we make decisions about the city and its resources. We also ensure their contribution to Wellington’s heritage and future is fully and publicly acknowledged. We work with mana whenua to explore opportunities for the city emerging from settlement of their Treaty of Waitangi claims, and engage with the wider Māori community in particular on issues of specific interest to them.

Other activities include:

These relationships are fundamental to the achievement of all our outcomes, and in particular contribute to the following outcome:

Outcome Outcome statement
People-centred city
  • Promotes inclusiveness, celebrates social and cultural diversity and enables us to respond to the needs and aspirations of Māori
  • Enhance the visibility of Māori culture and history by telling the story of Wellington’s Māori

Did you know?

Wellington was the first New Zealand city to host a parade to celebrate Te Reo for Te Wiki ō Te Reo Māori in 2016.

Our key achievements

We promoted inclusiveness, celebrated social and cultural diversity enabling us to respond to the needs and aspirations of Māori

We promoted inclusiveness and celebrated our cultural diversity by supporting a number of community events.  For Te Wiki o te Reo Māori in July 2015, we hosted or supported three free events: Toi te Kupu at the City Gallery; Te Awa-a-Taia Roller Disco at Kilbirnie Recreation; and we ensured that Te Raukura the Wharewaka o Pōneke and Pipitea marae were able to take part in Open House – our celebration of Wellington being the capital for 150 years. Te Rā o Waitangi (6 February) at Waitangi Park included local kapa haka performances. Our co-host, the Port Nicholson Block Settlement Trust, opened the Waitangi Day celebrations alongside local elected members. We also supported the Ngā Manu Kōrero regional and national speech contests. 

We supported Te Kāhui Kaiako Māori o te Whanganui-a-Tara (Wellington to Otaki Māori Secondary Schools Teachers Association) who hosted the regional speech contest at Te Papa. At the national speech contest, also hosted in the Wellington region, we supported the attendance of city colleges’ at the Te Rauparaha Arena contest in Porirua.

In September 2015, we supported the Mayor’s Tuia Young Māori Leader, Māia Huriwaka to host her Kāi-a-te Rangatahi event at Te Raukura – the Wharewaka o Pōneke. This event highlighted Māori who are working in challenging industries and celebrated their Māori identity in their work. We also promoted inclusiveness and celebrated our cultural diversity simply by maintaining formal relationships with our two mana whenua partners, and other Māori stakeholders. How we maintained these relationships, and how well we performed are discussed in the section “How we supported ourselves to do well”.

We enhanced the visibility of Māori culture and history by telling the story of Wellington’s Māori

We told the story of Wellington’s Māori by officially naming Whairepo Lagoon. Working with the Port Nicholson Block Settlement Trust the Whairepo Lagoon, adjacent to the Te Raukura the Wharewaka o Pōneke, was officially named ‘Whairepo’. This is the Māori name for the eagle ray that feeds and shelters in the lagoon. The eagle ray is considered kaitiaki (guardian). We celebrated our diversity and improved the visibility of Māori culture by helping with Matariki celebrations, together with a number of organisations. Matariki dates are dependent on the lunar moon and the rising of the Matariki constellation in 2015 occurred throughout June. Over 100 events were held across the region, and we supported the Purapurawhetū at the Opera House (17 June). This was the third successful Matariki Wellington Festival (matarikiwellington.org) with funding from the Regional Amenities Fund. We also welcomed the Welsh to Wellington - dragon meets taniwha. The Welsh rugby team was in town during Matariki and we welcomed them with a pōwhiri at Pipitea marae. Local iwi representative Holden Hohaia said of the visitors, “When we think of Wales and their history and legends compared to our own, they are very similar. It’s wonderful to take a traditional perspective on things. It takes us back to our roots. I think it’s a beautiful symbolism of our two cultures.”

Our performance

Health of our relationship with mana whenua: mana whenua were ‘satisfied’ with Council relationships. This is consistent with the result over the last two years.

Engagement with Māori residents: Māori residents satisfaction with their involvement in decision making didn’t meet its target. Further detail can be found in the chapter titled ‘Measuring our Performance’.

Finances

How it was funded

Services in this activity are funded through general rates.

What it cost 2015/16

Operating
Expenditure
($000)
Actual
2016
Budget
2016
Variance
2016
Actual
2015
1.2.1 Māori and mana whenua Partnerships        
Expenditure 274 282 8 202
Revenue - - - (10)
Net Expenditure 274 282 8 192

Governance – overall summary

Our governance activities were carried out as planned for year one of the LTP. To improve residents’ satisfaction with levels of consultation and involvement in decision making further work is needed through our developing Customer Strategy and new approaches to engagement. Work is also required on the ease of access to information in relation to our services. Our new Digihub initiative has been very successful. Our governance support for Council decision making, elections and Councillors continues to support the achievement of our outcomes.