Statements of Service Provision

2 Environment
​Taiao

Protecting and enhancing Wellington’s environment

BY THE NUMBERS

24.5 billion litres per day

Total residential and commercial water consumption. A decrease from 26.6 billion litres per day in 2015. 10

99km

Wellington coastline – a variety of sandy beaches and rocky shores and the city enclosed around the harbour. 11

Environment – at a glance

Outcomes Connected-city People-centred city Eco-city Dynamic-city
Relevant LTP objectives

“Investing to grow” through establishing a programme of major projects that grow the economy and deliver returns on investment;

Investing to maintain and improve existing services, including making infrastructure more resilient and the city’s transport system more efficient;

Increasing the use of existing assets rather than spending on new infrastructure;

Improving asset management practices to better manage risk and the timing of asset replacement; and

Achieving ongoing efficiencies from shared services and improved customer experiences.

LTP key activities

Parks, gardens, beaches and green open space.

Waste reduction and energy conservation.

Water, Wastewater and Stormwater.

Conservation attractions.

Relevant LTP projects Understanding impact of climate change; Low-Carbon; Our contribution to climate change; Southern landfill; Understanding key infrastructure; Managing harm from stormwater; Interactive children’s garden; Te Motu Kairangi / Miramar peninsula; Our natural capital and Freedom camping.
Operational expenditure Operational expenditure (as per financial summary).

The quality of Wellington’s environment depends on us all – the Council, residents, business, industries, regional and central government and others. We are a regulator, funder and a provider of services. We work in partnership with local communities, businesses, volunteer organisations and all levels of government.

We are responsible for vital services such as water supply, waste reduction and disposal, and wastewater and stormwater services. These networks are managed by the CCO – Wellington Water Ltd.

We manage our open spaces such as the Town Belt, Outer Green Belt and our city’s beaches and coastline. We fund conservation attractions such as Zealandia and Wellington Zoo. These attractions are also managed as CCOs.

We fund all of these services because they are important to the lives of individual Wellingtonians and to the community as a whole. They ensure that the city is safe and liveable, that basic human needs are met, and they minimise harmful effects from human activity. They also provide recreation opportunities, attract visitors, and make the city a beautiful place to live.

2.1
Gardens, beaches and green open spaces
Ngā wāhi wātea me ngā mahi papa atawhai

We manage the city’s natural environment and gardens in ways that balance conservation and enhancement with opportunities for enjoyment and recreation

What we do and why

Wellington is surrounded by nature. We preserve the city’s unique environment and protect and restore its biodiversity. A high-quality natural environment enhances the city’s unique ‘sense of place’ and provides attractive, safe and accessible spaces for leisure and recreation. Our aim is to enhance enjoyment of these areas.

Our activities include providing:

Over the year these activities helped us achieve the following outcomes:

Outcome Outcome statement
People-centred city
  • Beaches and coastal areas provide high quality natural spaces for leisure and recreation
  • The Botanic Gardens enhance Wellington’s unique ‘sense of place’
  • Community environmental initiatives that we fund improve the quality of our natural environment, and make the city a better place to work, live and play
  • Protecting biodiversity improves the quality of our environment making the city a better place to work, live and play
  • A clean inner harbour and waterfront area enhances Wellington’s unique ‘sense of place’, making it a great place to live
Connected-city
  • By supporting community environmental initiatives we support bringing people together and encourage community spirit
  • Walkways provide attractive, safe, and accessible opportunities for leisure and recreation, connecting people with each other and the environment
Eco-city
  • Pest management is important for biodiversity and protects native flora and fauna

Our key achievements

We carried out work in our local parks, open space and our walkways that enhanced Wellington’s unique “sense of place” making Wellington a great place to work, live and play

We improved access and opportunities in parks and open spaces. We acquired the inner city park - Flagstaff Hill - and created a fenced dog exercise area next to Ian Galloway Park.

Did you know?
We own and maintain 188 square metres of open space per capita or 3,833 hectares.

During Parks Week, working with our partners, we ran over 35 events which were attended by over 4000 people. We also supported our horticultural apprentices in a project called Hidden Gardens, in which gardens were planted in “hidden” areas across the city. This very successful event allowed us to support our emerging talent, promote some forgotten corners of the city, and get people out exploring our open spaces. Working with Porirua City Council we made progress on a master plan for the Porirua Outdoor Recreation Park (including Spicer Forest).

We continued to connect, engage and inspire people at “Wellington Gardens”. This is the new name for the Botanic Garden, Otari-Wilton’s Bush, Truby King House and Garden and Bolton Street Cemetery. We rebranded this year so we can better explain, leverage and promote each garden. At the Botanic Garden we began construction of Phase 1 of the Children’s Garden. We also worked with our partners (Nature Connections) to deliver a successful summer season promotion, including a successful trial of food trucks. We held another successful Spring Festival (which included Kids Day Out) and a ‘Meet the Curator’ annual rose pruning demonstration. Visitor numbers were down at the Botanic Garden as a result of visitor counters not working because of insect infestations. With the successful cruise ship season and summer over 2015, visitor numbers are thought to be well over 1.2 million.

At Otari-Wilton’s Bush we hosted the New Zealand Festival’s event ‘For the Birds’ which was attended by over 10,000 people. Our Otari-Wilton’s Bush staff completed a plant collections trip in Marlborough to fill gaps in the Otari collection, and collect seed for the New Zealand Indigenous Flora Seedbank (NZIFSB). We want to recognise and celebrate one of our curators, Karl Noldan, who was placed third in the National Young Horticulturist of the Year competition.

We continued to use Wellington Gardens to educate residents and visitors. Our new educator started providing environmental education to schools and delivering structured school holiday programmes.

Case study

Otari-Wilton’s Bush

Our staff at Otari-Wilton’s Bush are actively contributing to the conservation of New Zealand’s unique plant biodiversity, both locally and nationally. Staff grow endangered plants to be returned to the wild, and collect and deposit seeds into the New Zealand Indigenous Flora Seed Bank (NZIFSB), based in Palmerston North.

Among others, a success story from 2015/2016 was returning a sand daphne (Pimelea actea) to the Whanganui coast in partnership with the Department of Conservation. The endangered status of this sand daphne is nationally critical, the highest category of threat in New Zealand – the same threat category as kākāpō. After 2 years of propagating the plants at Otari we were able to return 31 to Castlecliff, Whanganui. Here the sand daphne is considered extinct after an erosion event destroyed the previous population of plants. We now have a further 200 plants that will be returned to Whanganui in 2016/2017.

Otari staff also contribute annually to the NZIFSB. The aim of the NZIFSB is to collect seeds of New Zealand flora to conserve plant species under threat – for example, from disease, habitat destruction, or predation. Withdrawals are possible for reintroduction of species and for research projects that will help conserve the species. Four of our staff received seed collecting training, facilitated by the Millennium Seed Bank, Kew, England.

Once collected, seeds are deposited and stored in freezers at minus 20° Celsius. Banked seeds can remain viable for decades, if not longer; a typical collection aims for an ideal deposit of 10,000 seeds per species.

Otari-Wilton’s Bush is also hosting seed bank workshops for volunteers who assist with seed cleaning and packaging, and will house a duplicate storage facility for some seeds from the seed bank.

We improved our network of walking and mountain bike tracks. We worked with the Capital BMX club to complete stage 1 of a BMX facility next to Ian Galloway Park, and constructed a new grade 2 bike trail at Karori Park. To promote the capital as a key mountain biking destination, and highlight the main reserves where this activity is popular, we made a series of five mountain biking videos which you can check out on our council website here: http://wellington.govt.nz/recreation/enjoy-the-outdoors/mountain-biking.

We carried out further work to upgrade our Town Belt including work on various trails and signage on Mt Victoria/Matairangi Town Belt and the Town Belt entrance from Hanson Street. We also played an integral role in the passing of the Wellington Town Belt Legislation 2016, which gives us responsibility to manage the Town Belt as a public recreation ground for the people of Wellington. Our most popular walkways are now included in a new brochure, Wellington Walks, which has proven very popular with over 30,000 copies distributed.

Our residents’ perception that the natural environment is appropriately managed and protected has marginally improved since last year.

Measure 2015/16 Actual Performance 2015/16 Target
Residents perception that the natural environment is appropriately managed and protected 79%
Improved performance
N/A
2014/15 Performance
78%

Source: WCC Residents’ Monitoring Survey

We ensured our beaches and coastal areas provide high quality natural spaces for leisure and recreation

We replenished the sand at our very popular Oriental Bay bringing the beach back to its 2003 sand levels.

We funded community environmental initiatives to raise awareness of environmental issues and improve environmental outcomes

We acknowledge we can’t protect the environment on our own and we ran six workshops to develop capacity in our environmental volunteers in the following areas: propagation, seed collection, pest animal trapping, citizen science and health and safety. There has been a significant increase in hours worked by volunteers over the year.

Measure 2015/16 Actual Performance 2015/16 Target
Hours worked by recognised volunteer groups and botanic garden volunteers 45,009
Improved performance
N/A
2014/15 Performance
43,880

Source: WCC Parks and Recreation

We also gave 37,182 plants to the community for planting and the community planted an additional 18,000 plants. We celebrated Arbor Day by planting trees at Spicer Forest with over 160 children from Tawa and Porirua schools.

We did not meet our targets for planting two million trees by 2020 or our integrated pest and weed control on high value biodiversity sites.  We were behind to plant two million trees because we lost our major partner (Greater Wellington Regional Council) who reprioritised their funding. We are now working with new partners and expect to achieve our target over time.

Measure 2015/16 Actual Performance 2015/16 Target
We will plant two million trees by 2020 1,345,773
Performance on target (within 3 percentage points)
1,389,777
2014/15 Performance
New Measure in the Long-term plan

Source: WCC Parks and Recreation

Did you know?

Through our Living City Fund we supported 22 projects with $50,282 of grants ranging from citizen science projects, local community gardens, volunteer groups in parks and reserves, and workshops. We also provided funding support to the Sustainability Trust who through their new Forresters Lane Eco Centre support various programmes around urban agriculture. You can find out more here: http://wellington.govt.nz/services/community-and-culture/funding/council-funds/our-living-city-fund.

We protected our biodiversity improving the quality of our environment making the city a better place to work, live and play

We cleared wilding pines from over 40 hectares of regenerating native vegetation throughout our parks and reserves. We are well below our performance last year for integrated pest and weed control on high value biodiversity sites. This is because we spent the year planning for our animal pest control programmes. Our Annual Plan 2016/17 includes a focus on our biodiversity strategy and action plan. We expect to significantly exceed our biodiversity target in 2016/17.

Measure 2015/16 Actual Performance 2015/16 Target
The percentage of high value biodiversity sites covered by integrated animal pest control or weed control 52%
Performance on target (within 3 percentage points)
55%
2014/15 Performance
67%

Source: WCC Parks and Recreation

We also enhanced Wellington’s biodiversity through our Otari-Wilton’s Bush staff plant collections trip to Marlborough as noted above.

Our first livestream video of wildlife - KakaCam - had massive engagement with over 65,000 views, and a total viewing time of 2.5 years - averaging 21 minutes per view. You can check out the highlights here: http://wellington.govt.nz/services/environment-and-waste/environment/biodiversity/kaka-cam.

Our performance

The quality of our open spaces: We had a successful year in our newly branded Wellington Gardens with well attended events at both the Botanic Gardens and Otari- Wilton’s Bush. We didn’t meet our target for the number of residents who were satisfied with the quality and maintenance of our natural environment. Our performance on this measure was lower than last year, and this will be an area of focus in the future.

The quality of street cleaning services: Resident’s satisfaction with the quality of street cleaning was higher than last year but below our target. While reported satisfaction did not meet our target, this was not reflected in an increase in complaints.

The quality and quantity of work we undertake to protect biodiversity: With the loss of our project partner, Greater Wellington Regional Council, we were behind our target for planting two million trees by 2020. With our new partners we are now on track to achieve this target. We spent the year planning animal pest control programmes, and expect to significantly exceed this biodiversity target in 2016/17.

The success of our investments in conservation attractions: Visitor numbers at the Zoo and Zealandia continue to grow, with a significant increase in visitors at Zealandia.

Further detail can be found in the section titled ‘Measuring our Performance’.

Finances

How it was funded

Services in this activity are funded through a mixture of general rates and user charges.

What it cost 2015/16

Operating
Expenditure
($000)
Actual
2016
Budget
2016
Variance
2016
Actual
2015
2.1.1 Local Parks and Open Spaces 1        
Expenditure 7,851 8,756 905 8,497
Revenue (501) (415) 86 (608)
Net Expenditure 7,350 8,341 991 7,889
2.1.2 Botanical Gardens        
Expenditure 4,852 4,752 (100) 4,883
Revenue (408) (387) 21 (417)
Net Expenditure 4,444 4,365 (79) 4,466
2.1.3 Beaches and Coast Operations 2        
Expenditure 1,023 1,409 386 996
Revenue (53) (51) 2 (50)
Net Expenditure 970 1,358 388 946
2.1.4 Roads open spaces        
Expenditure 8,044 8,147 103 8,204
Revenue (634) (695) (61) (614)
Net Expenditure 7,410 7,452 42 7,590
2.1.5 Town belts 3        
Expenditure 4,491 4,665 174 4,283
Revenue (358) (250) 108 (1,425)
Net Expenditure 4,133 4,415 282 2,858
2.1.6 Community environmental initiatives        
Expenditure 739 743 4 634
Revenue (18) - 18 (1)
Net Expenditure 721 743 22 633
2.1.7 Walkways        
Expenditure 532 582 50 569
Revenue - - - -
Net Expenditure 532 582 50 569
2.1.8 Biodiversity (pest management)        
Expenditure 1,673 1,704 31 1,663
Revenue (32) (38) (6) (76)
Net Expenditure 1,641 1,666 25 1,587
2.1.9 Waterfront Public Space 4        
Expenditure 5,404 1,737 (3,667) 7,726
Revenue (6,325) (301) 6,024 (6,932)
Net Revenue (921) 1,436 2,357 794
Capital
Expenditure
($000)
Actual
2016
Budget*
2016
Variance
2016
Actual
2015
2.1.1 Local Parks and Open Spaces 5        
Expenditure 1,368 1,089 (279) 1,116
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward N/A 702 - N/A
2.1.2 Botanical Gardens        
Expenditure 405 405 - 681
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward N/A 28 - N/A
2.1.3 Beaches and Coast Operations        
Expenditure 242 227 (15) 613
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward - - - -
2.1.5 Town belts 6        
Expenditure 197 115 (82) 106
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward N/A 20 - N/A
2.1.7 Walkways        
Expenditure 565 550 (15) 624
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward N/A - - N/A

*The capital expenditure budget consists of the LTP amount plus the carry forward from 2014/15.
1Under budget due to savings in depreciation on park buildings.
2Under budget mainly as grant funding for the Lyall Bay Surf Club was not paid as the club is still fundraising for their new building.
3Under budget due to unbudgeted vested asset revenue and savings in interest costs.
4Under budget due to favourable revaluation of waterfront property.
5Under budget due to the timing of spend on the Children’s Garden project at the Botanic Gardens.
6Over budget due to unbudgeted spend on landscaping works at the halfway house which were funded through monies received from the electricity industry for use of Council land.

2.2
Waste reduction and energy conservation
Whakaiti para, hangarua me te pena pūnga
Top

Sustainability is about meeting our needs now without burdening future generations

What we do and why

A sustainable city uses resources efficiently, re-uses or recycles them, and only commits them to landfills as a last resort. Sustainability is about reducing the amount of energy we use and using clean energy from renewable sources. It is also about promoting a culture that values the environment and encourages pro-environment behaviour of everyone who lives, works or plays there.

We manage and monitor:

Over the year these activities contribute to the following outcomes:

Outcome Outcome statement
People-centred city
  • Collaboration between the Council and the community to reduce waste, and increase recycling, promotes community ownership of the sustainable management of the environment
Eco-city
  • Reduced waste, increased waste recycling, and organic composting, minimises the use of landfills and promotes sustainable management of the environment

Our key achievements

We collaborated with the community to reduce waste, and increase recycling, to promote community ownership of sustainable management of the environment

To reduce waste and increase recycling we developed an Event Recycling Guide for recycling at public events. We also now provide 15 event recycling bins (and hoods) that are available for free at public events. These bins will help reduce the cost of recycling services at public events and use the national recycling colours: yellow for recycling, red for landfill, green for organics and blue for glass. Already used at a series of Island Bay events, feedback from residents and event organisers was positive.

Measure 2015/16 Actual Performance 2015/16 Target
Percentage of residents satisfied with recycling services 84%
Performance on target (within 3 percentage points)
85%
2014/15 Performance
86%

Source: WCC Residents’ Monitoring Survey

Measure 2015/16 Actual Performance 2015/16 Target
Percentage of residents satisfied with waste collection services 85%
Did not achieve
90%
2014/15 Performance
85%

Source: WCC Residents’ Monitoring Survey

We reduced waste, increased waste recycling and organic composting, to minimise the use of landfills and promote sustainable management of the environment

We transferred our successful seed-funded ‘start-up’ Kai to Compost Food Waste Collection Service to EnviroWaste. This allowed us to better meet the increasing demand for food waste diversion, and extended collection boundaries to Porirua, Upper Hutt, and beyond. Since the transfer of ownership in December 2015, our Composting Operations experienced a 10% increase in the volume of food waste.

Food waste collected from businesses in our city continues to be processed through our Capital Compost operation, at the Southern Landfill, with EnviroWaste paying disposal fees. To assist the commercialisation of the above ‘start-up’, EnviroWaste will be subsidised through to 2017 provided they meet food waste volume targets.

To minimise waste, our Waste Minimisation Seed Fund offers funding of up to $70,000 per year. The fund supports residents becoming leaders in the development of innovative solutions for reducing waste volumes in landfills. The fund targets priority waste streams, reduction in harm to the environment, and improved efficiency of resource use. It does this by supporting new initiatives that complement and enhance existing programmes or address gaps or opportunities. Over the year funding was approved for six medium/ large scale projects including Wellington Hospital and Cuba Street waste audits, the NZ Post corporate uniform end-of-life initiative, the Newtown and Island Bay Festivals, and CupaDupa. Funding was also approved for smaller projects including a play centre compost system, development of a website by a high school to encourage reuse of unwanted local construction waste, and an educational compost programme for early childhood schools. The fund comes from landfill levies collected by the Ministry for the Environment and is consistent with Wellington’s Waste Management and Minimisation Plan (2011–2017).

Measure 2015/16 Actual Performance 2015/16 Target
Waste diverted from landfill 17,431 tonnes
Improved performance
16,500
2014/15 Performance
18,048

Source: WCC Waste Operations

To reduce food waste we continued to work with councils in the region on a programme developed under the regional Waste Education Strategy - the Love Food Hate Waste Prevention programme. The programme focuses on food waste, an area considered by all councils as important to manage. Launched on 1 June 2016, the 3-year programme aims to educate households about how to reduce food waste, save money, and have fun at the same time. The project is funded by Councils and the Ministry for the Environment.

Did you know?

On average Kiwi families throw out $560 of avoidable food waste every year, totalling $872 m nationally! Every year 20 million loaves of bread are thrown out by households alone! Find out more at LoveFoodHateWaste.co.nz

We focussed on energy efficiency for households and businesses to reduce costs and greenhouse emissions

We launched the ‘Wellington 2050 Energy Calculator’ and are the first city in New Zealand and the second city in the world, following Beijing, to launch one. The calculator allows Wellingtonians to explore how energy and transport choices will shape the city’s carbon footprint, and inform the update of our Climate Change Action Plan.

We contributed to the warmth, health, and energy efficiency of Wellington homes through ‘Warm up Wellington’ – a partnership (with Capital and Coast DHB, Energy Efficiency and Conservation Authority (EECA), Hutt Mana Charitable Trust, and the Sustainability Trust) that supplements the Government’s Warm Up New Zealand home insulation scheme. Over the year, ‘Warm Up Wellington’ insulated 167 homes in Wellington City. Our Wellington Home Energy Saver scheme provides homeowners with free home energy assessments, a comprehensive report on the energy performance of their home, and a list of personalised recommendations and discounts on a range of energy efficiency products. We carried out 603 home energy assessments over the year, and in response home occupants accessed $11,283.13 in subsidies through 262 energy efficient products.

We launched the ‘Smart Buildings Challenge to assist commercial building owners to manage and reduce their energy use. The Challenge, a partnership with EECA, Microsoft, and the Energy Management Association of New Zealand, aims to significantly reduce energy consumption in Wellington’s commercial building sector. It does this by harnessing the collective commitment of Wellington’s building owners to reduce costs and increase sustainability performance. The Challenge supports the goal of achieving a minimum 10% reduction in energy use (electricity and gas) and we achieved NABERSNZ certification over the course of the challenge. We entered our Central Library Building into the challenge. The Challenge exceeded expectations in terms of the total floor area of the buildings involved and market penetration but did not meet its target of signing up 25 buildings. Twenty buildings signed up over the course of the year with one pulling out when it was sold. We therefore decided to focus on the buildings already in the challenge before bringing more on-board.

We continued to help Wellington schools access solar array systems to reduce their energy bills and educate students about renewable energy. We completed our 16th SchoolGen school solar installation in partnership with Genesis Energy during the year.

We developed partnerships and encouraged policies for renewable energy

We ran a Low Carbon Challenge that brought together Wellington’s innovators to develop initiatives to reduce emissions. Formally known as the Smart Energy challenge, a record 13 applications were made, and six teams selected to continue through to the incubator programme. Three of these six teams will qualify for match-funding of $15,000 from us.

We achieved Certified Emissions Management and Reduction Scheme (CEMARS) accreditation. This means we can have confidence that the data we collect is accurate and comprehensive and a precise measure of how we are performing. We can now start to measure our energy and emissions reduction progress against our 2015/16 audit or ‘baseline year’ and make more informed decisions about our work programmes. We are the third council in New Zealand to have attained CEMARS accreditation after Kapiti Coast and Dunedin City.

We consulted on and produced the Low Carbon Capital Plan 2016-2018 which contains three pillars of action; greening Wellington’s growth, changing the way we move, and leading by example. The plan sets new interim targets for the City and our corporate greenhouse gas emissions. The targets are based on newly developed Wellington specific tools and data. The target retains the 2050 target of an 80% reduction in emissions for both Wellington City and Wellington City Council.

Internationally, cities have emerged as major players in climate change mitigation and adaptation efforts. We are keen to learn from best international practice and over the year were accepted into the C40’s international ‘Compact of Mayors’ pledge to reduce city-wide greenhouse gas emissions. The Compact of Mayors is the world’s largest cooperative effort among Mayors and city leaders to share information and experiences in order to reduce emissions, track progress and prepare for the impacts of climate change. Our acceptance into the Rockefeller Foundations 100 Resilient Cities (100RC) programme, and our appointment of a Chief Resilience Officer, are also significant events. Adapting to cope with the effects of climate change is a key area of focus for the Resilience Strategy.

Did you know?

In conjunction with Greater Wellington Regional Council, we updated the Wellington City and Region Community Scale Greenhouse Gas Inventory 2000/01 to 2014/15. The results show that between 2000/01 and 2014/15 the gross greenhouse gas emissions generated within Wellington City, or as a result of activity within the area, have reduced by 2.1 % and our net emissions by 1.9 %.

Our performance

The quality of waste reduction and recycling services: There was a significant improvement, from last year, in the percentage of residents who regularly recycle, and we exceeded the target we set for the year. We exceeded our target for the amount of waste diverted from the landfill, but this figure is lower than last year.

The quality of our waste disposal services: Our residents’ satisfaction with waste collection services was the same as last year but below our target. Energy sourced from the Southern Landfill was slightly more than last year but also below our target. There are many possible reasons for this including a drop in general waste going to landfill, a higher proportion of food waste being diverted from landfill and lower levels of rainfall.

The quantity of our energy consumption and emissions: There has been an increase in our corporate energy use around our swimming pools to reflect the increased size of the Keith Spry Pool and re-opening of Tawa pool. However overall there has been a decrease in our energy consumption.

Further detail can be found in the section ‘Measuring our Performance’.

Finances

How it was funded

Services in this activity are funded through a mixture of general rates, user charges and other income.

What it cost 2015/16

Operating
Expenditure
($000) 
Actual
2016
Budget
2016
Variance
2016
Actual
2015
2.2.1 Waste minimisation, disposal and recycling management 1        
Expenditure 12,869 12,836 (33) 12,663
Revenue (14,309) (12,829) 1,480 (13,308)
Net Revenue (1,440) 7 1,447 (645)
2.2.2 Closed landfills aftercare        
Expenditure 477 522 45 368
Revenue - - - -
Net Expenditure 477 522 45 368
2.2.3 Energy efficiency and conservation        
Expenditure 315 282 (33) -
Revenue (82) (46) 36 -
Net Expenditure 233 236 3 -
Capital
Expenditure
($000)
Actual
2016
Budget*
2016
Variance
2016
Actual
2015
2.2.1 Waste minimisation, disposal and recycling management 2        
Expenditure 723 753 30 781
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward N/A 545 - N/A

* The capital expenditure budget consists of the LTP amount plus the carry forward from 2014/15.
1 Under budget due to higher landfill fees through high contaminated soil and special waste volumes, higher than budgeted sales of yellow rubbish bags and favourable sales from recyclable materials.
2 Under budget due to delays in Stage 4 of the Southern Landfill improvements. Currently in the design phase.

Our 3 waters – water, wastewater and stormwater

We contract Wellington Water Ltd – to manage our water and drainage assets. They are tasked to deliver clean and safe drinking water, collection, disposal and treatment of wastewater and a collection and disposal of stormwater.

Water Supply

Asset descriptions Length (m) /
Quantity (no)
Pipes 1,188,140
Pump stations 33
Reservoirs 69
Valves 30,270
Service valves (incl.FIRE) 52,516
Hydrants 8,048

2.3
Water
Wai
Top

Clean, safe water is essential for residents’ quality of life and wellbeing

Wellington Water Ltd:

Was established in 2014, through a merger between Greater Wellington Regional Council Water Supply Group and Capacity Infrastructure Services (who were originally owned by Hutt, and Wellington City Councils). The five local authorities are joint and equal owners, with each local authority owning its respective water, stormwater and wastewater assets, and in control of the level and standard of services provided to customers. The services provided include provision of high quality, safe and environmentally sustainable services, contracted service delivery and asset management planning.

Relevant Council outcomes:

People-centred city A reliable and adequate supply of clean and safe water is crucial for the health, well-being and prosperity of all residents
Connected-city A reliable and adequate supply of clean and safe water is a core requirement of a 21st century connected city

Key activities:

  • Ensuring high quality water is available at all times for drinking and other household and business uses
  • Maintaining 80 reservoirs, 34 pumping stations, 8,000 hydrants and 1,250 kilometers of pipes

Key achievements

We continued work providing a reliable and adequate supply of clean and safe water which is crucial for the health, wellbeing and prosperity of all residents
  • We renewed approximately 9 kilometers of water pipes in Tawa, Johnsonville, Khandallah, Karori, Crofton Downs and Northland. These renewals help us improve the reliability of the network by reducing service outages. We have completed all forward designs for our 2016/17 renewals and upgrade programmes, and tendered out a significant amount of renewal and upgrade works
  • Our new 2200m3 Melrose reservoir was completed. Replacing an existing reservoir, this new reservoir improves water availability and our seismic resilience
  • We completed seismic upgrades at the Linden Reservoir and Lyndhurst pump stations. These upgrades improve the resilience of the network. Work also started on upgrading the Huntingdon Street pump station
  • We awarded a tender for seismic strengthening on the Tawa Reservoir, with construction starting in the 2016/17 year. The reservoir is being strengthened to improve water retention after a significant seismic event
  • Other emergency preparedness includes: designing auto-shut valves for the Granada and Mt Kaukau reservoirs, and installation of three new 25,000 litre emergency water tanks. There are now 38 emergency water tanks at 35 locations in suburbs around Wellington
  • We started upgrading 640 meters of water mains in Cecil Road, Wadestown in order to meet firefighting standards. This work will be completed in 2016/17
We continued work providing a reliable and adequate supply of clean and safe water – a core requirement of a 21st century connected city
  • In 2015 we worked on a business case for water supply resilience. The process involved: developing and agreeing investment objectives, establishing levels of service, developing and assessing options (in consultation with stakeholders), and identifying possible projects. The purpose of the business case is to confirm the concept and develop high level cost estimates for an investment plan
  • At the same time we set up a regional resilience group which includes the NZTA, Wellington Water Ltd, Fire Service and Wellington Electricity. This group is developing a cross-infrastructure resilience investment story. We are also talking with critical customers who will require special attention or will assist others in recovering from a large event in Wellington

Performance

We continue to fully comply with New Zealand drinking water standards (and its monitoring regime) and maintain the water supply quality gradings from the Ministry of Health. The quality of our potable water is monitored for indicators of contamination and chlorinated to reduce the risk. There are procedures in place to ensure the quality of water supplied and to deal with any quality issues. Contractors who work on the network also have quality control procedures to reduce the risk of contamination. The percentage of real water loss from our reticulated network continued to be below our target. Our response time for urgent and non-urgent call outs indicated customers are being well looked after. We received 8822 urgent and non-urgent requests over the year, compared to 8553 the year before. There were a low number of unplanned supply cuts in the network. Our customers were satisfied with our service with their satisfactions levels above our target. These measures can be found in the section ‘Measuring our Performance’.

Source: Wellington Water Ltd

Finances

How it was funded

Services in this activity are funded through targeted rates.

What it cost 2015/16

Operating
Expenditure
($000)
Actual
2016
Budget
2016
Variance
2016
Actual
2015
2.3.1 Water Network 1        
Expenditure 23,511 23,393 (118) 22,798
Revenue (1,709) (35) 1,674 (1,012)
Net Expenditure 21,802 23,358 1,556 21,786
2.3.2 Water Collection and Treatment        
Expenditure 14,922 14,932 10 14,318
Revenue (3) - 3 (3)
Net Expenditure 14,919 14,932 13 14,315

Capital
Expenditure
($000)
Actual
2016
Budget*
2016
Variance
2016
Actual
2015
2.3.1 Water Network 2        
Expenditure 14,927 15,752 825 13,266
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward N/A - - N/A

* The capital expenditure budget consists of the LTP amount plus the carry forward from 2014/15.
1 Under budget due to savings in depreciation and the acquisition of water assets vested to Council.
2 Under budget due to delays across the work programme including the Cecil Road watermain where the proposed contractor was not available as scheduled.

Case study

Melrose reservoir increases city’s resilience

In May 2016, the valve was opened on a new, seismically resilient reservoir serving the suburb of Melrose.

The reservoir cost $3.5 million and took 16 months to build. It holds 2.2 million litres of water, making it two and a half times bigger than its 1910 predecessor. Construction involved demolishing the old reservoir; excavating about 1500 cubic metres of earth; and installing underfloor drainage, the reinforced concrete floor slab and walls, and a pre-cast concrete roof. The reservoir is buried to minimise its impact on the landscape.

Melrose reservoir increases the amount of the city’s water supply held in seismically-strengthened reservoirs to almost 70%. More than 80% of those reservoirs have automatic shut-off valves, meaning they won’t empty if the water network gets damaged. This is all part of an ongoing programme to make Wellington’s water storage facilities and supply network stronger, safer and better able to meet the needs of a growing population.

Melrose reservoir by the numbers:

  • 16 months’ construction
  • $3.5 million
  • 25 metres long, 17 metres wide and 7 metres deep
  • Built to withstand a one-in-1000 year earthquake
  • Holds 2.2 million litres – two and a half times bigger than the reservoir it replaced

2.4
Wastewater
Parawai
Top

Maintaining public health and safety and is essential to the city’s environmental wellbeing

Relevant Council outcomes:

People-centred city A safe and reliable wastewater network and treatment facility provides protection against public health risks
Eco-city A safe and reliable wastewater network and treatment facility provides protection against environmental harm

Key activities

  • The city’s sewage collection, treatment and disposal is in line with resource consent conditions

Key achievements

We continued to work to ensure a safe and reliable wastewater network and treatment facility protects against public health risks
  • We replaced damaged wastewater and stormwater pipes in Cuba Street. Work to replace damaged wastewater and stormwater pipes in Molesworth Street was delayed by contaminated ground, however we are back on track and making good progress towards completion in 2016/17
  • We renewed four wastewater pump stations in Chaffers Street, Ferry Street, Boscobel Lane and Wakefield Road, improving their reliability
  • Our programme to investigate and evaluate inflow and infiltration reduction in the Trelissick Park (Kaiwharawhara) catchment continued. Over the year we surveyed approximately 1088 properties, and finalised their reports.Inflow and infiltration reduction investigations will continue in 2016/17 focusing on Karori and Tawa
  • Pollution investigations have been on-going in seven catchments that exceeded water quality thresholds. These investigations identified faults that were remedied, resulting in minor improvements in water quality in certain catchments
We continued to ensure we have a safe and reliable wastewater network and treatment facility that provides protection against environmental harm
  • We renewed 4.3 kilometres of wastewater pipes in Brooklyn, Island Bay, Karori, Kelburn, Khandallah, Lyall Bay, Miramar, Mt Cook, Mt Victoria, Ngaio, Te Aro, Vogeltown and Wadestown. These renewals reduce sewage leaking into the stormwater system and prevents discharges ofsewerage into streams and the sea. We achieved a reduction in bypass discharges from Moa Point WWTP in 2015/16

Performance

Our wastewater network was of a high quality with few reticulation incidents and our response time was well within our targets. In relation to our response times we received 904 service requests compared to 1095 last year. The majority of our customers were satisfied with our service and we exceeded our target. We are working on capacity and demand issues across the network to help identify dry weather wastewater overflows. These measures can be found in the section ‘Measuring our Performance’.

Source: Wellington Water Ltd

Finances

How it was funded

Services in this activity are funded through a mixture of general and targeted rates.

What it cost 2015/16

Operating
Expenditure
($000)
Actual
2016
Budget
2016
Variance
2016
Actual
2015
2.4.1 Sewage collection and disposal network 1        
Expenditure 18,833 19,157 324 19,348
Revenue (1,911) (615) 1,296 (986)
Net Expenditure 16,922 18,542 1,620 18,362
2.4.2 Sewage treatment 2        
Expenditure 22,599 22,654 55 21,333
Revenue (1,583) (618) 965 (1,833)
Net Expenditure 21,016 22,036 1,020 19,500
Capital
Expenditure
($000)
Actual
2016
Budget*
2016
Variance
2016
Actual
2015
2.4.1 Sewage collection and disposal network 3        
Expenditure 10,872 10,480 (392) 7,959
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward N/A - - N/A

* The capital expenditure budget consists of the LTP amount plus the carry forward from 2014/15.
1 Under budget due to reduced unplanned maintenance following a drier than usual year and the acquisition of waste water assets vested to Council.
2 Under budget due to savings in Wastewater treatment plant costs owing to lower flows and management fees.
3 Over budget due to additional labour costs and an early completion of the Jackson Street waste water renewal.

2.5
Stormwater
Wai-ua
Top

The stormwater network keeps people and property safe from flooding

Wellington Water Ltd manages the following assets

Stormwater

Asset descriptions Length (m) /
Quantity (no)
Pipes 795,046
Manholes 19,380
Pump stations 2
Tunnels 3,083
Relevant Council outcomes
People-centred city A safe and reliable stormwater network, and effective maintenance and operation programmes, prevents avoidable disruptions to community living, minimises risk of injury and damage to property from stormwater
Connected-city A safe and reliable stormwater network, and effective maintenance and operation programmes, reduces the risk of avoidable surface flooding and environmental damage that may affect transport routes

Key activities

  • The maintenance, renewal and upgrade of the stormwater network to protect from flooding

Key achievements

We continued to work on a safe and reliable stormwater network, and effective maintenance and operation programmes, to prevent avoidable disruptions to community living, minimises risk of injury and damage to property from stormwater
  • We carried out a number of urgent replacements this year including Porritt Avenue where we upgraded a brick culvert located under several properties. Several Karori Stream bridge crossings were also upgraded to align with the latest building code standards
  • We continued to develop Integrated Catchment Management Plans (ICMPs) for five catchment areas, based on the effects of flooding and contamination on the catchment’s coastal environment. These plans are prepared as condition of resource consent. We made progress on one of these five plans – the Lambton Harbour catchment plan. The aims of Lambton Harbour ICMP are to: prepare detailed management plans to meet the levels of service required for the city’s stormwater activities, identify management options to minimise catchment issues, and identify remedial methods for issues identified
We continued to work on a safe and reliable stormwater network, and effective maintenance and operation programmes, to reduce the risk of avoidable surface flooding and environmental damage that may affect transport routes
  • We renewed approximately 750 meters of stormwater pipes, these renewals improved the reliability of the network by reducing service outages and flooding
  • We completed detailed investigations and design for the upcoming repair of a steel culvert located under 15 meters of fill in South Karori. Repair work on this culvert will be completed in the 2016/17
  • We progressed design options for the repair of Council drains lost in the land slip at Breton Grove, Kingston. We are continuing to work with residents to provide a mutually agreeable solution

Performance

We had few stormwater pipeline blockages and our network performed better than target. Customer satisfaction with stormwater management declined. Our monitored beaches and sites were clean and suitable for recreation use. In terms of our response times we received 1518 requests over the year compared to 1240 last year. We maintained resource consent compliance. These measures can be found in the section ‘Measuring our Performance’.

Source: Wellington Water Ltd

Did you know?

We, along with Wellington Water Ltd, Te Runanga Toa Rangatira and the community are part of GWRC Te Awarua o Porirua Whaitua process. The Whaitua Committee is responsible for developing a Whaitua Implementation Programme (WIP) which will outline regulatory and non-regulatory proposals for integrating the management of land-development and urban-water-cycle-services at a catchment level. Wellington Water Ltd has undertaken a high level review of the stormwater, wastewater and water supply networks to assess their potential to support proposed growth and intensification within the catchment. Issues have been identified that could restrict urban development and result in further contamination of aquatic environments. A master plan for upgrade of the drainage infrastructure is being developed by Wellington Water Ltd. While the upgrade costs are likely to be significant it is recognised as being essential to support the growth agenda of both Wellington and Porirua City, as well as helping realise the values of Te Awarua-o-Porirua.

In 2012 we, Porirua City Council, GWRC, Te Runanga Toa Rangatira and other key agencies with interests in Porirua Harbour (and catchment) adopted the Te Awarua-o-Porirua Harbour and Catchment Strategy and Action Plan. Te Awarua-o-Porirua (Porirua Harbour) is currently exposed to a range of existing impacts from urban activity, which result in damage to the environment. Without mitigation, future development has potential to hasten this current degradation. This on-going partnership aims to reduce sediment, reduce pollutants and restore the ecology of Porirua harbour.

Finances

How it was funded

Services in this activity are funded through a mixture of general and targeted rates.

What it cost 2015/16

Operating Expenditure ($000) Actual
2016
Budget
2016
Variance
2016
Actual
2015
2.5.1 Stormwater management 1        
Expenditure 16,936 17,587 651 16,526
Revenue (3,137) (146) 2,991 (922)
Net Expenditure 13,799 17,441 3,642 15,604
Capital
Expenditure
($000)
Actual
2016
Budget*
2016
Variance
2016
Actual
2015
2.5.1 Stormwater management 2        
Expenditure 4,877 5,055 178 4,821
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward N/A 600 - N/A

* The capital expenditure budget consists of the LTP amount plus the carry forward from 2014/15.
1 Under budget due to lower interest and sump cleaning costs as well as the acquisition of stormwater assets vested to Council.
2 Under budget due to delays in the work programme. A $0.600m carry forward to 2016/17 will be requested for the uncompleted Molesworth Street project.

Did you know?

We have created a post-event response team which is expected to provide improved customer service after an unexpected event such as a flood. This multi-skilled team is drawn from across the business and depends on information from our client councils and other sources to determine the best response for our customers.

2.6
Conservation attractions
Ngā painga kukume Papa Atawha
Top

Nature is one of Wellington’s biggest attractions

Wellington Zoo Trust

Established in 2003 the Trust manages the Zoo’s assets and operations for the benefit of residents and visitors.

Relevant Council outcomes

People-centred city Facilities such as Wellington Zoo play important conservation roles protecting native and exotic flora and fauna
Eco-city These are activities that inform and educate residents and visitors about conservation. They tell a story about our past, our special wildlife and native and exotic flora and fauna

Key activities

The Zoo Trust:

  • Develops, manages and plans animal species management programmes
  • Promotes species conservation
  • Acquires additional plant and animal species
  • Supports and complements the conservation and learning activities undertaken by other organisations
  • Promotes and coordinates the raising of funds to assist the management, administration, maintenance, planning, promotion and further development of Wellington Zoo
  • Manages, administers, plans, develops, maintains, operates and promotes Wellington Zoo as a zoological park for the benefit of the Wellington community and as an attraction for visitors to Wellington
  • Educates the community by building an awareness of plant and animal species and the actions required to promote conservation

Key achievements

Facilities such as Wellington Zoo play important conservation roles protecting native and exotic flora and fauna

  • Saving animals in the wild: the Zoo supports nine field conservation projects locally and globally for endangered or critically endangered species. It provides 5.68% of its operational funding directly to field conservation (the international zoo benchmark is currently 3%)

These are activities that inform and educate residents and visitors about conservation. They tell a story about our past, our special wildlife and native and exotic flora and fauna

  • Connecting people with animals: A record number of people visited the Zoo during the year. There were 11,413 school visits and 3,677 people had ‘animal close encounters’ experiences with Zoo animals
  • Leading the way: the Zoo maintained its carboNZero certification and achieved Zoo Aquarium Association Australasia Animal Welfare Accreditation
  • People love and support the Zoo: the Zoo achieved 92% of its annual targets and enhanced its volunteer programme this year

Performance Information

The Zoo achieved its admission targets for the year and numbers are above last years. This measure can be found in the section ‘Measuring our Performance’.

Source: Wellington Zoo Trust

Council Controlled Organisation – Zealandia

We contracted Zealandia, to manage the Karori Sanctuary

Zealandia

The Karori Sanctuary Trust (trading as Zealandia) is an incorporated society, a charitable trust, and a not-for profit organisation. Zealandia is a community-driven eco-restoration project, education facility, and visitor attraction. The 225 hectare sanctuary is 10 minutes drive from central Wellington, and is the world’s first fully-fenced urban eco-sanctuary. Zealandia is a safe haven for some of New Zealand’s rarest native animals.

Relevant Council outcomes

People-centred city Facilities such as Zealandia play important conservation roles protecting native and exotic flora and fauna12
Eco-city These are activities that inform and educate residents and visitors about conservation. They tell a story about our past, our special wildlife and native and exotic flora and fauna

Key activities

The Trust

  • Carries out education and research into all matters pertaining to the conservation and restoration of New Zealand’s natural heritage and in particular to restore representative examples of New Zealand’s natural heritage
  • Establishes and maintains a secure native wildlife sanctuary in the Karori Reservoir
  • Restores the reservoir area ecosystem as closely as practicable to its presumed pre-human state but allowing for construction of specific habitats to enhance its diversity and conservation values
  • Provides facilities for recreation and tourism activities
  • Seeks and fosters community support and participation
  • Manages and manipulates such ecosystems as may be necessary to maintain requisite populations

Key achievements

Facilities such as Zealandia play important conservation roles protecting native and exotic flora and fauna
  • The first translocation in 5 years was completed in February 2016 with the reintroduction of Spotted Skink back to the valley
These are activities that inform and educate residents and visitors about conservation. They tell a story about our past, our special wildlife and native and exotic flora and fauna
  • Sirocco the ambassador kakapo visited for 6 weeks, generating local, national, and international promotion and media coverage
  • The Trust celebrated the sanctuary’s 20th Anniversary since its establishment in 1995 and welcomed 125,849 visitors for the year to 30 June 2016

Performance Information

  • Zealandia’s visitation exceeded 100,000 for the first time in its history and there was also an increase in education visits

Source: Zealandia

Finances

How it was funded

Services in this activity are funded through general rates.

What it cost 2015/16

Operating
Expenditure
($000)
Actual
2016
Budget
2016
Variance
2016
Actual
2015
2.6.1 Conservation visitor attractions        
Expenditure 6,384 6,459 75 6,104
Revenue - - - -
Net Expenditure 6,384 6,459 75 6,104
Capital
Expenditure
($000)
Actual
2016
Budget*
2016
Variance
2016
Actual
2015
2.6.1 Conservation visitor attractions        
Expenditure 2,725 2,659 (66) 2,677
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward N/A 140 - N/A

* The capital expenditure budget consists of the LTP amount plus the carry forward from 2014/15.

Environment – overall summary

Generally speaking we carried out the activities planned for this activity area in year one of the LTP. Our capital works programmes experienced delays, some of which were a result of events beyond our control. We had a number of successes with our water, wastewater and stormwater services. These successes are reflected in our water and wastewater customer satisfaction ratings and the improved ratings of monitored beaches used for recreation. The Zoo and Zealandia continue to be successful. In many areas, progress has been made through our activities in this area to the achievement of our outcomes.

10Wellington Water Ltd
11WCC Wellington City Profile – Key Facts about the City
12Zealandia eliminates as many exoctic flora and fauna species as it can from the sanctuary to ensure exotic trespasers don’t compromise the native sanctuary.