Statements of Service Provision

5 Social and Recreation
Pāpori me te hākinakina

Sustaining safe, resilient and healthy communities

BY THE NUMBERS

1.3 million

Number of swims residents took in city pools,
this compares to 1.2 million in 2014/15. 23

94%

Occupancy rate of available housing facilities. This is 4% above our target. 24

Social and Recreation – at a glance

Outcomes Connected-city People-centred city Eco-city Dynamic-city
Relevant LTP objectives

“Investing to grow” through establishing a programme of major projects that grow the economy and deliver returns on investment;

Investing to maintain and improve existing services, including making infrastructure more resilient and the city’s transport system more efficient;

Increasing the use of existing assets rather than spending on new infrastructure;

Improving asset management practices to better manage risk and the timing of asset replacement; and

Achieving ongoing efficiencies from shared services and improved customer experiences.

LTP key activities Recreation promotion and support. Community support. Public health and safety.
Relevant LTP projects Social housing; Homelessness; Recreation and community facilities; Basin Reserve re-development; National Hockey Stadium; Johnsonville facility improvements; Dog exercise areas; Removing graffiti; and a child friendly city.
Operational expenditure Operational expenditure (as per financial summary).

The Council’s social and recreation work includes providing housing for people in need, funding city safety initiatives, regulating and monitoring food and liquor outlets, preparing to deal with earthquakes and other emergencies, providing community and recreation centres and halls, providing public toilets and cemeteries, pools and libraries, supporting community groups and events, providing sport and recreation facilities, neighbourhood playgrounds and dedicated areas for our dogs. In this activity area we fund, facilitate and sometimes regulate. We work with others and ensure we don’t replicate the effort of clubs, volunteer organisations, businesses and individuals to help themselves.

We fund these services because they matter to the lives of individual Wellingtonians, and to the community as a whole. They help to protect the most vulnerable people, keep people safe and healthy, and strengthen communities.

These activities also provide opportunities for people to live healthy lifestyles, to reach their potential, and enjoy themselves.

5.1
Recreation promotion and support
Ngā rauhanga hapori

We provide a wide variety of community facilities throughout the city to encourage quality of life and healthy lifestyles

What we do and why

Our sporting and recreation facilities encourage people of all ages to engage in activities that help them live more active and healthy lives. Some facilities also attract visitors and raise the city’s profile by hosting national and international events.

Our activities include:

Over the year these activities contribute to the following outcomes:

Outcome Outcome statement
People-centred city
  • Swimming pools, sportsfields, recreation centres, golf courses and recreation programmes provide access to sport and recreation opportunities important for people’s health and the well-being
  • Playgrounds provide access to recreation opportunities and physical play for younger children which is important for their development and health and well-being
  • Marinas support access to the harbour and the coast for recreation, fishing and enjoyment
Connected-city
  • Swimming pools, sportsfields, recreation centres, golf courses and recreation programmes bring people together, strengthening social cohesion and making the city a better place to live
Did you know?

Wellington has over 40 sport grounds which are used for club and school sport throughout the year.

Our key achievements

We made significant progress towards providing facilities that give residents  access to sport opportunities important for health and well-being and that bring people together, strengthening social cohesion and making the city a better place to live

We completed gravel banding to improve drainage on the sportsfield at Karori Park, and began the development of two sand sportsfields at Martin Luckie Park. We applied for consent to construct a new artificial surface at (the former) Terawhiti Bowling Club in Karori, and the new artificial hockey turf at Mt Albert Park. User satisfaction with our artificial sportsfields has increased over the year, and is significantly above target. Satisfaction with grass fields is below target and has declined since last year largely due to environmental conditions beyond our control.

Utilisation of our artificial sportsfields was generally less than expected. Whilst well used in July for school holiday programmes, unpredictable weather and costs meant Primary Schools were reluctant to make bookings over the rest of the off peak winter period. Usage in peak summer is generally low as schools use their own field, and low in off peak winter because of low demand on weekend evenings. Summer usage increased with the American football at Alex Moore Park and increased training hours at Nairnville.

MEASURE 2015/16 Actual Performance 2015/16 Target
Percentage of utilisation of artificial sportsfields Peak Winter 68%
Did not achieve
Peak Summer 36%
Did not achieve
Off-peak Winter 15%
Did not achieve
Off-peak Summer 10%
Did not achieve
Peak Winter 80%
Peak Summer 40%
Off-peak Winter 25%
Off-peak Summer 20%
2014/15 Performance
Peak Winter 68%
Peak Summer 32%
Off-peak Winter 25%
Off-peak Summer 11%

Source: WCC Parks and Recreation

An upgrade at the Wellington Regional Aquatic Centre, which included relocating and refurbishing Club Active Gym, and, upgrading the front of house and the spa areas, was also completed. Planning work is also underway for the refurbishment of the Hataitai Ballpark and Kelburn Park sports pavilions. The number of visits to swimming pools has increased from last year, and is above target. User satisfaction with swimming pools has improved from last year but is still below target.

Measure 2015/16 Actual Performance 2015/16 Target
User satisfaction with swimming pools 88%
Did not achieve
90%
2014/15 Performance
85%

Source: WCC Parks and Recreation

We worked with sports clubs and schools at Kilbirnie Park, Alex Moore Park and Hataitai Ballpark on the formation of community sports hubs, and with the Lyall Bay Surf Life Saving Club on the planning of their proposed new surf club building.

Did you know?

The frequency residents engage in physical activity has increased from 71 % in 2014/15 to 74 % in 2015/1625 .

Work outlined the Basin Reserve Masterplan also started. During the year we completed the construction of the upgraded ground keeping facilities and started working on deferred maintenance on the Vance Stand.

Our recreation facilities continued to host a range of local, regional, national and international competitions in a range of sports, including: swimming, diving, underwater hockey, waterpolo, basketball, netball, volleyball, futsal and floorball. Whilst usage of our community halls has increased, usage of community centres has decreased.

Measure 2015/16 Actual Performance 2015/16 Target
Residents usage of City Councils community and recreation facilities Community Hall 21%
Improved performance
Community Centre 20%
Did not achieve
N/A
2014/15 Performance
19%
22%

Source: WCC Residents’ Monitoring Survey

Other achievements include our pool lifeguards winning the National Pool Lifeguard Championship, and providing funding and support for emerging athletes through the Wellington City Council Sport Talent Development programme.

Case study

Shift: improving young women’s wellbeing in Wellington

Shift is a pilot project led by our Community Partnerships Team within Parks, Sport and Recreation. It began in February 2016 and aims to increase the physical activity levels and wellbeing of young Wellington women through co-design and empowering them to build their own solutions to health and wellbeing issues.

Shift focusses on five areas:

  • Delivering 10-week programmes around physical activity and wellbeing in Wellington secondary schools
  • Building core groups of female Shift Leaders who are mentored to champion physical activity and wellbeing within their schools and wider communities Increasing the number of fun, social, low-cost community-based physical activity and wellbeing opportunities on offer in Wellington – targeting young women aged 12–20 years
  • “Give back, Shift forward” – a crowdsourced fund through PledgeMe, where young women can apply for funding to participate in movement opportunities in Wellington
  • Shift Jams, held at BizDojo, for groups of young Wellington women to practise leadership, and learn about social entrepreneurship and building wellbeing solutions using a people-focussed approach

To date, Shift has engaged with more than 200 young Wellington women and held more than 50 Shift activities and events using our open spaces and recreational facilities. The first round of the Give back, Shift forward fund opened 1 July and aims to support at least 20 young women in accessing a physical activity opportunity that would, for financial reasons, be otherwise unavailable to them. Shift is a joint initiative between Wellington City Council and The Boys and Girls Institute, funded by grants from Sport Wellington, the Ministry of Social Development, Lottery Community and supported by a vast array of individuals and organisations who are passionate about seeing young Wellington women flourish. Shift aims to engage with a minimum of 600 young women in 2016 and continue the project in 2017.

Measure 2015/16 Actual Performance 2015/16 Target
Resident’s perceptions that there are barriers to participating in recreation activities. See Reference
Page
Fig. 6 for
full detail

Improved performance
N/A
2014/15 Performance
See Fig. 6

Source: WCC Residents’ Monitoring Survey

We provided playgrounds to give access to recreation opportunities and physical play for younger children which is important for their development and health and wellbeing

Over the year we completed four playground renewals at Gilbert Young Play Area, Churchill Park and Play Area, Chorley Grove Play Area, and Cheyne Walk Play Area. To assist our younger people we used money ($250,000) received from the New Zealand Community Trust towards our ‘Youth in Sport’ programme at the ASB Sports Centre, the ‘Push-Play’ programme, and the 2016 Dragon Boat Festival.

We carried out work on our marinas to support access to the harbour and the coast for recreation, fishing and enjoyment

Renewal works were completed at the Evans Bay Marina, including the replacement of piles, bearers and fendering.

Did you know?

The Berhampore Golf course opened in 1915 as a 9 hole golf course and was extended to an 18 hole course in 1921. Nestled in the Town Belt and now known as Mornington Golf Club, the multi sport complex offers Wellingtonians bowls, Bocce (an Italian version of bowls) a playgroup for under 5-year olds, and a tai chi group.

Our performance

Quality and usage of recreation facilities: We didn’t meet our targets for the use of artificial sportsfields - peak and off-peak. Whilst winter off-peak usage is based on football school holiday programmes, at other times usage depends on the demand from schools which is driven by the unpredictable weather and costs. User satisfaction with swimming pools was also below our target, although an improvement on last year. There was an increase in visits to pools from last year and we exceeded our target. User satisfaction with recreation centres was also below our target but an improvement on last year. Visits to recreation centres including the ASB Sports Centre increased from last year and exceeded our target. Further detail can be found in the section ‘Measuring our Performance’.

Finances

How it was funded

Services in this activity are funded through a mixture of general rates and user charges.

What it cost 2015/16

Operating Expenditure ($000) Actual
2016
Budget
2016
Variance
2016
Actual
2015
5.1.1 Swimming Pools 1        
Expenditure 21,138 20,476 (662) 20,520
Revenue (7,017) (7,587) (570) (6,806)
Net Expenditure 14,121 12,889 (1,232) 13,714
5.1.2 Sportsfields        
Expenditure 3,272 3,405 133 3,417
Revenue (273) (295) (22) (319)
Net Expenditure 2,999 3,110 111 3,098
5.1.3 Sportsfields (Synthetic)        
Expenditure 1,258 1,354 96 1,237
Revenue (473) (524) (51) (418)
Net Expenditure 785 830 45 819
5.1.4 Recreation Centres 2        
Expenditure 9,425 9,702 277 9,705
Revenue (2,754) (2,657) 97 (2,653)
Net Expenditure 6,671 7,045 374 7,052
5.1.5 Recreation partnerships        
Expenditure 992 1,088 96 1,049
Revenue - - - -
Net Expenditure 992 1,088 96 1,049
5.1.6 Playgrounds        
Expenditure 759 737 (22) 746
Revenue - - - -
Net Expenditure 759 737 (22) 746
5.1.7 Marinas 3        
Expenditure 565 602 37 511
Revenue (596) (592) 4 (582)
Net Revenue (31) 10 41 (71)
5.1.8 Golf Course 4        
Expenditure 225 270 45 221
Revenue (60) (77) (17) (58)
Net Expenditure 165 193 28 163
5.1.9 Recreation programmes 5        
Expenditure 252 282 30 345
Revenue (128) (15) 113 (59)
Net Expenditure 124 267 143 286
Capital
Expenditure
($000)
Actual
2016
Budget*
2016
Variance
2016
Actual
2015
5.1.1 Swimming Pools        
Expenditure 2,535 2,417 (118) 5,185
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward N/A - - N/A
5.1.2 Sportsfields 6        
Expenditure 1,125 575 (550) 517
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward N/A 75 - N/A
5.1.3 Sportsfields (Synthetic) 7        
Expenditure 223 223 - 47
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward N/A 337 - N/A
5.1.4 Recreation Centres 8        
Expenditure 112 246 134 27
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward N/A 14 - N/A
5.1.5 Recreation partnerships 9        
Expenditure 857 906 49 234
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward N/A 3,100 - N/A
5.1.6 Playgrounds        
Expenditure 429 414 (15) 602
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward N/A - - N/A
5.1.7 Marinas        
Expenditure 524 522 (2) 92
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward N/A 36 - N/A

*The capital expenditure budget consists of the LTP amount plus the carry forward from 2014/15.
1 Over budget due to lower revenue and higher labour costs.
2 Under budget due to higher revenue and savings in interest costs.
3Under budget due to lower maintenance costs.
4 Under budget due to lower maintenance and vehicle costs.
5 Under budget due to additional revenue to support programmes.
6 Over budget due to unbudgeted works on Martin Luckie park to support elite sport. Additional funding of $550,000 was approved by Council.
7 Under budget due to delays in completing the additional turf for the National Hockey Stadium and the synthetic turf sportsfield for Terawhiti park.
8 Under budget due to savings in the capital renewal programme.
9 Under budget due to delays in the upgrade works planned for the Basin Reserve.

5.2
Community participation and support
Tautoko hapori
Top

We provide leadership as a key influencer on the city’s wellbeing through partnerships and/or collaborations to improve community wellbeing and to ensure local services meet local needs. We support a city wide network of community spaces, libraries, community organisations, and provide homes for people whose needs are not met by state housing or the private housing market

What we do and why

We want Wellington to be a people-centred city that supports diverse and inclusive communities. We support a network of community spaces and libraries to provide a focal point for community activities and programmes. We also support community leadership and advocacy to strengthen community resilience and safety.

We partner with Police and social agencies to coordinate a city-wide approach to homelessness. By providing social housing, with a focus on tenant welfare, we provide stability for vulnerable households.

Our activities include the following:

Over the year these activities contribute to the following outcomes:

Outcome Outcome statement
People-centred city
  • Libraries are neighbourhood institutions that anchor community life and bring people together
  • We support the development of individual wellbeing, safe neighbourhoods and cohesive, engaged and inclusive communities
  • Social and recreation grants promote individual well-being, safe neighbourhoods and cohesive, engaged and inclusive communities. They also support active and healthy lifestyles through support of recreation and sporting groups
  • Community housing provides an opportunity for a home and better quality of life for those less well off without unreasonable hardship
  • Community centres and halls are important anchors in our community. They are a place to gather, strengthen social cohesion, and make the city more appealing place to live
Connected-city
  • Libraries are places of learning and allow connections with others and the exchange of knowledge

Did you know?

Wellington had New Zealand’s first Library, the Port Nicholson exchange, and Public Library that opened in 1841.

Our key achievements

We continued to work on our libraries which are neighbourhood institutions that anchor community life and bring people together

As part of our “Libris 175” celebrations which marked 175 years of public library service in Wellington, Mayor Wade-Brown unveiled a plaque at the spot near Parliament where a Wellington’s first library - raupo hut - stood. Our Libraries and Community Spaces took part in the first New Zealand Chinese Language Week (September 2015). They hosted a variety of events including language lessons, story time for children, and painting and calligraphy classes. Progress also continued on our Johnsonville Library which is becoming part of the community facilitates hub in Johnsonville. Located on Moorefield Road, near the Johnsonville Community Centre and Keith Spry pool, the renowned Wellington Architects – Athfield Architects – worked with the community on design options. The design chosen has a covered walkway that connects the new library, to the recently renovated Keith Spry Pool, and though to Memorial Park. User satisfaction with library services and facilities has improved.

Measure 2015/16 Actual Performance 2015/16 Target
User satisfaction with Library services and facilities 93%
Improved performance
90%
2014/15 Performance
87%

Source: WCC City Libraries

We improved the use of our Libraries as places of learning that allow connections with others and the exchange of knowledge

We ran a Summer Reading Challenge over the 2015 Christmas holidays. The challenge was for children (aged 5–12) to read and review as many titles as they could from the Challenge booklist. At the same time we ran the ‘Libraries Challenge’ where children were challenged to visit each Wellington library and complete a fun literacy-based activity. This was the fourth summer that the Summer Reading Challenge was held, and each year has seen a growth in awareness and participation. The 2015/16 Summer Reading Challenge had the highest level of participation to date. Other libraries and schools in New Zealand are interested in running similar programmes in their area.

Did you know?

We have a new system for the circulation and management of our library collection. We have replaced the old barcode and electromagnetic system with a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tag in all 800,000 of our collection items. We did this because our existing system was reaching the end of its useful life and repair of the supporting equipment was difficult with spare parts not readily available. RFID provides greater customer self-service, and allows our staff to focus on valued-added services such as community outreach, programmes and reader’s advisory.

We continued to undertake community advocacy to support the development of individual well-being, safe neighbourhoods and cohesive, engaged inclusive communities.

We have a strong interest in ensuring the city’s social infrastructure is robust and responsive to local needs. We achieve this by supporting and building community resilience and advocate to ensure the city’s most vulnerable are supported. For example, we take a “Zero Tolerance” approach to loneliness in our communities. The importance of this work has been highlighted with the tragic deaths of residents found undiscovered (for some time) in their homes. We established a cross agency working group to target services to support such isolated people and help identify gaps in their current support. We work with agencies such as Age Concern, the Mental Health Foundation, Neighbours Day Aotearoa, Wesley Community Action and St Vincent de Paul. We established an ongoing drop-in service for residents at our Dixon St flats, where one of these deaths happened. We also worked with the St Pauls apartment’s body corporate to put on a Neighbours Day event-getting to know your neighbours-in response to the death of a long-term tenant.

We continued to work with partner organisations, such as the Police and Housing New Zealand to improve community outcomes in Strathmore Park. A long-term plan for the rejuvenation of Strathmore Park was developed using a community led engagement process. The plan identified a need for a local community space - to enable services and programmes to be developed and delivered locally. We plan to have this in place by August 2016.

Over the year we welcomed new refugee families into Wellington. All new arrivals were given a Council welcome pack – translated into relevant languages. The welcome pack included an introduction to the city, council services and community facilities. We also continued to develop excellent working relationships with the Red Cross and other councils in our region, to enable a joined up response to the needs of new refugees.

We undertook innovative work to better understand begging and address residents’ concerns about the increase of begging on our streets. The purpose of the project was to develop a community approach to stop street begging. During the project we spoke with people who beg as well as residents, retailers, the police, and social services agencies. The project concluded the underlying national issues that lead to begging need addressing, and a joined up approach to street management was needed.

We built on our commitment to end homelessness by continuing to fund the objectives of the community driven collaboration – Te Whakamura Ai te Ahi. We also increased resources to our street outreach team. A new strategic leadership group, chaired by our Mayor, was established to end street homelessness in Wellington by 2020.

Our community focussed work in the inner city included a number of community activities. We established an Inner City Liaisons Forum for community organisations to focus on and align approaches to inner city community issues. We continued to develop central-city-based initiatives in partnership with the Police, residents and retailers. This included a community garden on Bond Street –an ongoing project seeking to build neighbourliness in the area.

We continued our focus on projects to improve accessibility, and worked with the Blind Foundation on placing sensors throughout the city. These sensors will provide real-time geospatial information, which can be accessed by a smartphone app, to assist the blind, and vision impaired, to safely navigate around the city.

We also continue to support accessibility through our City Mobility project. A joint initiative with TSB Bank, City Mobility provides free mobility scooters to help people get around and enjoy Wellington. A second mobility scooter site was recently added at Wellington Railway Station. Our partnership with the Halberg Trust has resulted in a free beach wheel chair which can be hired from the Freyberg Pool in Oriental Bay. We are still below our target in relation to our Accessible Wellington Action Plan initiatives, but we have made progress since 2014/15.

Measure 2015/16 Actual Performance 2015/16 Target
Accessible Wellington Action Plan initiatives planned for next year. 85%
Did not achieve
90%
2014/15 Performance
77%

Source: WCC City Communities

Did you know?

As part of our Urban Agriculture programme we have supported 40 groups who have joined the Guardian Fruit tree programme this year. These groups will be planting round 120 fruit trees across the city. We have over 30 community gardens, a well-established network of community orchards and the first urban farm was set-up last year.

As part of our Growing Your Neighbours programme we worked with the community to record their stories. This programme started as #wellynextdoor, you can check out the website here: http://www.wellynextdoor.co.nz/

Community story-telling ensures important memories and stories stay in our collective memory and can be shared with future generations. The programme has continued to grow and connect Wellingtonians in the inner city. In particular, it connects residents in apartments reducing social isolation that often results from the transient nature of apartment living.

Case study

#wellynextdoor

The #wellynextdoor programme is helping our city become a safer and nicer place to live by connecting Wellingtonians and increasing communication between neighbours.

A group of third-year Massey University students worked with the Council’s Community Services team to create a project that would help neighbours get to know each other in an organic, genuine and spontaneous way. The result was #wellynextdoor, which included the theme “peg up your stories”. We asked residents to share a story about their neighbours on our special postcards – how they met or interacted – and this provided a catalyst for other people to meet their neighbours. The students turned a selection of these stories into animated videos, which are on the Council’s website and #wellynextdoor website.

The #wellynextdoor recording caravan gave Wellingtonians the opportunity to share their stories about what they enjoyed most about Wellington. In the lead-up to Anzac Day 2016, people were encouraged to record their memories and experiences of New Zealand’s contribution to the wars. MP Nuk Korako told of his “journeys of remembrance” to places the 28th Māori Battalion fought in World War II – a special trip for family members of the soldiers. The collection of these stories means that they won’t fade from our collective memory and can be used to educate future generations, and remember those who served.

We continued to provide social and recreation grants to promote individual well-being, safe neighbourhoods and cohesive, engaged and inclusive communities. They also support active and healthy lifestyles through support of recreation and sporting groups

Our grants continued to support our city wide network of community centres. Over the year we supported local organisations with 80 grants totalling $290,332. This figure included 28 grants under $500 through our Neighbours Day Aotearoa Fund, and support for local residents associations and community projects.  We also provided some organisations with multi-year contract funding to support the delivery of community services26 .

Our Pools Partnership Fund supported local schools by increasing the total available pool capacity and providing aquatic programme opportunities throughout the city. As a result Wellington East Girls College and Rewa Rewa School have started upgrading their pools. Berhampore and Kilbirnie Schools also received support for facility improvements, and Newtown and Kahurangi Schools started planning for building work and refurbishment in 2016/17.

Our Sportsville Partnership Feasability Fund also supported the Worser Bay Boating Club, and Wellington Tennis Incorporated (Renouf Tennis Centre). They are developing plans to ‘hub’ sport facilities in the city.

This year we added two new focus areas to our community grants projects to support community resilience and the settlement of refugees in the city.  Building our social resilience is part of our Resilience Strategy which is a key focus area in our Long-term plan 2015–25.

We made progress providing community housing and better quality of life for those less well off without unreasonable hardship

We provided affordable housing for nearly 4,200 tenants from low-income households that would otherwise have struggled to make their homes in the city. The majority of our tenants are satisfied with our housing services and facilities, and overall condition of their house.

Measure 2015/16 Actual Performance 2015/16 Target
Percentage of tenants satisfied with housing services and facilities. 94%
Improved performance
90%
2014/15 Performance
94%

Source: WCC Tenant Survey 2016

Measure 2015/16 Actual Performance 2015/16 Target
Percentage of tenants rating of the overall condition of their house/apartment (good and very good) 96%
Improved performance
90%
2014/15 Performance
95%

Source: WCC Tenant Survey 2016

Our City Housing Upgrade Project is the largest local government led social housing redevelopment project undertaken in New Zealand. With co-funding from central government and oversight from the Treasury and the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment, we are working (this is the 8th year in a 20 year programme) to upgrade 2,300 homes at a cost of $400 million. We are on track with the 20 year programme agreed with Treasury. During the year we continued construction of the Kotuku Apartments and commenced site works for the Arlington Site 2 Apartments. At Arlington Site 2 we adopted a partnering approach with both architects and construction companies that resulted in a design build agreement and an innovative modular design for Arlington Site 2. This is a first for social housing in New Zealand, the design of the ten four storey blocks provides flexibility to reconfigure the unit sizes as demand changes. Demolition of the existing buildings started in March 2016 and the project is scheduled for completion in late 2018. A detailed business case for the Arlington Site 1 development was presented to Council’s Community Sports and Recreation Committee. The reconfiguration and refurbishment of Kotuku Apartments was a more traditional two phase approach. Phase I blocks were reoccupied in May/June 2015, and Phase II was completed in July 2016 and is now fully occupied.

Over the year we continued to work closely with Housing New Zealand (HNZ) at both a national and regional level to make best use of knowledge and resources. This included sharing tenancy management. We also continued to support HNZ by leasing to them some of our low-demand units for their tenants whose homes were being upgraded. Our housing effort has been recognised and we won both the regional and national New Zealand Institute of Architects Award for Marshall Court (Miramar) in the multi-unit residential category. The Marshall Court flats also won the Winstone Wallboards Residential Award at the New Zealand Commercial Project Awards. In addition, eight of our staff were recognised as Certified Housing Professionals by the Australasian Housing Institute for professionalism in social housing.

We ran a strength-based community development programme alongside the housing upgrade to help increase social capital and community spirit and pride within City Housing communities. We continued to deliver a wide range of programmes focused on tenant wellbeing and increasing inclusiveness and connectedness. This included tenant led celebrations of Chinese New Year, Neighbours Day and Matariki. More than 70 of our tenants attended our Tenant Forum on maintenance and repairs. More of our tenants reported positive social contact over the year.

Measure 2015/16 Actual Performance 2015/16 Target
Housing Services tenants who report positive social contact 94%
Improved performance
N/A
2014/15 Performance
94%

Source: WCC Tenant Survey 2016

We continued to create safe and attractive communal areas, such as Hobart Park, Booth Street, Daniell Street and Darwin Street in Karori. In addition, over 80 tenants volunteered to become kaitiaki – tenant leaders who put in thousands of hours each year to help improve their communities. We partnered with the NZ Fire Service and Police to promote fire safety at Berkeley Dallard Apartments.

We also identified a number of Special Housing Areas (SHA) where we offer a streamlined resource consent process through the Housing Accords and Special Housing Act (HASHAA). SHA qualifying developments must be predominantly residential and low rise (under six storeys or 27 metres high). This will help us increase the number and range of housing options in Wellington.

We have undertaken work on our community centres and halls which are important anchors to our community – a place to gather and strengthen cohesion

We began the year by planning for upgrades of community facilities in Aro Valley Centre and Newtown. We also supported the establishment of new community centres in Seatoun and in Berhampore, working in partnership with Berhampore School and Housing New Zealand (at Centennial Flats). Occupancy rates for our community facilities are falling because demand is variable. The figures in the table below represent all seven of our community spaces. The majority of the other community spaces are near full capacity during the popular times, which includes the afterschool period, mornings and evenings. However, some bookings are only for 6 to 8 months preventing other users from booking for the full year, though casual users are always welcome. Our Linden Community Centre is also a difficult space to fill because of its location.

Measure 2015/16 Actual Performance 2015/16 Target
Percentage of occupancy rates of community centres and halls 39%
Did not achieve
45%
2014/15 Performance
34%

Source: WCC City Communities

Our performance

Quality and usage of library services and community centres and halls: Physical visits to our libraries decreased from last year and were below our target. This decline was largely a result of under reporting of door counter units (since resolved through our new RFID exit gates), closure of the Newtown Library for 3 months maintenance, and our on line services (such as making payments, reserving books, and borrowing ebooks and magazines). The number of library items issued increased from last year but did not meet our target. The increase over the year was a result of increased availability and usage of our eBook collection. We didn’t meet our target largely because of continued declining issue rates for DVDs and CDs as more download and streaming options become available in the marketplace. Over the coming year we will review the viability of continuing to provide CD collections as the decline has accelerated faster than we had projected. User satisfaction with library services and facilities increased from last year and was above our target. Web site visits along with e-library user satisfaction increased over the year and numbers were above our targets. Occupancy rates for our community centres and halls (excluding the ASB Sports Centre) increased from last year but we didn’t meet our target. This was largely because of the variable demand for space over the calendar year – which often prevents weekly bookings.

Quality and usage of housing services: We exceeded our targets for tenant satisfaction with services and facilities and the overall condition of their houses. Residents’ rating of the overall condition of houses was higher than last year. Our occupancy rate of available houses is also above our target. We achieved all of our milestones for our Housing Upgrade Project with the Crown. Further detail can be found in the section ‘Measuring our Performance’.

Finances

How it was funded

Services in this activity are funded through a mixture of general rates and user charges.

What it cost 2015/16

Operating
Expenditure
($000)
Actual
2016
Budget
2016
Variance
2016
Actual
2015
5.2.1 Libraries 1        
Expenditure 21,129 20,843 (286) 20,635
Revenue (1,452) (1,590) (138) (1,542)
Net Expenditure 19,677 19,253 (424) 19,093
5.2.2 Access support (Leisure Card)        
Expenditure 102 105 3 56
Revenue - - - -
Net Expenditure 102 105 3 56
5.2.3 Community Advocacy        
Expenditure 1,329 1,279 (50) 1,487
Revenue (9) - 9 (11)
Net Expenditure 1,320 1,279 (41) 1,476
5.2.4 Grants (Social and Recreation)        
Expenditure 3,643 3,643 - 2,749
Revenue (23) - 23 (19)
Net Expenditure 3,620 3,643 23 2,730
5.2.5 Housing 2        
Expenditure 22,294 25,540 3,246 24,500
Revenue (34,256) (43,272) (9,016) (35,866)
Net Revenue (11,962) (17,732) (5,770) (11,365)
5.2.6 Community centres and halls        
Expenditure 3,248 3,201 (47) 3,010
Revenue (364) (231) 133 (281)
Net Expenditure 2,884 2,970 86 2,729

Capital
Expenditure
($000)
Actual
2016
Budget*
2016
Variance
2016
Actual
2015
5.2.1 Libraries 3        
Expenditure 4,566 4,948 382 2,255
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward N/A 950 - N/A
5.2.5 Housing 4        
Expenditure 14,940 14,888 (52) 19,167
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward N/A 15,505 - N/A
5.2.6 Community centres and halls        
Expenditure 146 154 8 19
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward N/A - - N/A

* The capital expenditure budget consists of the LTP amount plus the carry forward from 2014/15.
1 Over budget due to lower revenue and higher labour costs.
2 Under budget due to the timing of the recognition of the Crown grant for the Housing Upgrade Project.
3 Under budget due to delays with the Johnsonville Library upgrade and development work on the Library computer system.
4 Under budget due to delays in the Housing renewal programme and the Housing upgrade at the Arlington complex.

5.3
Public health and safety
Hauora tūmatanui me te haumanu
Top

We work to protect Wellingtonians from threats to their health and safety

What we do and why

Public confidence in the safety of the city’s streets and suburbs is a top priority. Wellington has a reputation for being a safe city with a vibrant CBD, which we wish to retain. Wellington’s location makes earthquake-preparedness particularly important, though the city is also at risk of other civil emergencies, such as flooding and tsunamis. We have legislative obligations to maintain public health standards by regulating food and liquor outlets, animals, trade waste and managing environmental noise problems. We also provide public toilets, cemeteries and crematorium services as a vital public health function.

Our activities include:

Over the year these activities contribute to the following outcomes:

Outcome Outcome statement
People-centred city
  • Cemeteries provide sensitive and respective bereavement services catering for a wide range of communities and beliefs
  • Public toilets are located conveniently throughout the city protecting residents from health hazards
  • Legislative public health regulations protect us from a variety of public health hazards
  • City safety activities promotes individual wellbeing, safe neighbourhoods and a safer inner city
  • Wellington Regional Emergency Management Office and Rural Fire works with all sectors of the community to ensure we are well-prepared for earthquakes and other natural disasters

Did you know?

The City Council Cemetery records date back to 1849, including the records from the Bolton Street Cemetery, now Bolton Street Memorial Park.

Our key achievements

We undertook work in our Kaori and Makara cemeteries and continued to provide services for a wide range of communities and beliefs

We completed earthquake strengthening on the two chapels (including the crematorium building) and the staff depot building at Karori Cemetery. We also replaced the cemeteries cremator unit and added more gardens to the Seaforth Memorial Gardens. At Makara Cemetery, we added new headstone beams in several of the denominational sections.

We improved public toilets located conveniently throughout the city protecting residents from health hazards

We undertook maintenance work on some of our public toilets. In addition, we improved our response rate to requests and exceeded our targets for cleanliness and maintenance.

Work continued on legislative public health regulations to protect residents from a variety of public health hazards

We engaged with the hospitality industry around the changes arising from the Food Act which came in effect on 1st March 2016.

We have 1933 active Health Licences which included food premises of all types, hairdressers, swimming pools, funeral homes and animal boarding establishments. Food premises such as restaurants, cafes, takeaways, caterers, butchers, delicatessens and fishmongers totalled 1175. Of these 1175 premises, 514 held an excellent grade. There were eight cleaning notices issued to premises during the course of the year and two premises were issued closure. This compares to one closure and 17 cleaning notices in 2014/15.

To help customers apply for their food and alcohol licences, we have also put a large number of our application forms online.

We exceeded our target for the percentage of inspections of medium, high and very high risk premises (alcohol licensed premises) that were carried out during peak trading hours. However our performance was lower than 2014/15. This is because of the change in performance criteria as a result of the enactment of Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012. This change resulted in an increase of 190 inspections over the year.

For the 2015/16 year more peak time inspections were carried out but resulted in a lower percentage in relative terms because of the significant increase in the number of premises in the criteria.

During the year we consulted with residents on the review of our animal bylaw and dog policy.

We undertook a number of city safety activities to promote individual wellbeing, safe neighbourhoods and a safer inner city

Our Local Hosts celebrated their third anniversary. As city ambassadors, the hosts were busy on the streets, helping increased numbers of tourists, assisting at events and festivals and being on hand to support city centre users including students and other young people. Over the year the team extended its reach to the waterfront and continued to visit the suburbs, concentrating on Kilbirnie and Newtown. Our hosts helped identify city hotspots and worked with the Police, social sector and other agencies to assist people in need, sharing relevant information to achieve an integrated approach.

Case Study

Local Hosts – Customer Service

Our Local Hosts are on the streets of Wellington 7 days and 4 nights a week, helping people with directions and information, and checking in with retailers. One of the most important functions they perform is linking homeless people with social services.

They also deal with abuse and violence regularly, and are often the first people on the scene when people need assistance. One of our Local Hosts received a Safety in the City award in October after helping to save the life of a person under the influence of drugs.

While it’s not always high drama, the Local Hosts’ job requires them to engage with everyone – from helping tourists with directions through to working with door staff to make sure people get home safely and preventing incidents from escalating. They also have a relationship with Police, and have assisted them in locating people wanted for arrest.

Working with the justice sector and community organisations such as the Red Cross, we continued to be a key partner in a city wide project aimed at reducing family violence. We have also developed a pilot project focussed on refugee and migrant communities due to begin in the 2017 financial year. Our innovative ‘Eyes On’ partnership with the Police and city retailers made significant progress. The project was expanded from Cuba Street into the wider CBD and Johnsonville. Pharmacies became the latest group to join the scheme, which now has approximately 350 members.

We launched our new volunteer graffiti removal programme “Blank it Out”.  The aim of the programme is to increase the amount of graffiti removed from private property, at the same time as encouraging more community ownership and pride.  Recruiting individual residents to volunteer, as well as neighbourhood groups, businesses, schools, and service organizations and clubs is a key component of this programme.  “Blank it Out” is an effective way to engage clusters of volunteers in ongoing graffiti clean-up, rather than just a one-time paint out. This initiative will also help keep targeted locations graffiti-free. Volunteers commit to activities ranging from spotting and reporting graffiti, to coordinating local removal projects. People can register as an individual or as part of an existing community group, and there are no minimum time requirements or expectations. We exceeded our response rate target for graffiti removal.

Measure 2015/16 Actual Performance 2015/16 Target
Response times for graffiti removal 85%
Improved performance
80%
2014/15 Performance
New Measure in Long-term plan

Source: WCC City Communities

We supported the Zeal Education Trust to trial the Youth Host initiative. This project saw a team of youth workers out in the CBD from 8pm to 1am on Friday nights connecting with young people and the wider community. During its pilot period, between May and October 2015, Zeal’s Youth Host team spent 155 hours over 31 nights working with detached youth.  Following the success of the pilot project the Youth Host team have continued their work in Wellington’s CBD on Friday nights.

We supported several other initiatives focussed on improving safety within the city including the establishment of the Pasifika Community Patrol, Suburban Community Patrols, and Safer Places. We also worked closely with Police to deliver specific safety campaigns such as the successful window shoppers campaign to reduce theft from cars in the CBD.

We continued to work with the WREMO to ensure we are well-prepared for earthquakes and other natural disasters.

Our emergency Welfare Team continued to work to prepare us for a future emergency and to ensure people and animals have the support they need in a civil defence emergency. We updated the Emergency Preparedness Poster to include the new Wellington Water Ltd recommendations for the amount of water to be stored in preparation for an emergency. This poster was developed in collaboration with community stakeholders and shows alternative Drop, Cover, Hold options for people with accessibility and mobility issues. The poster is largely pictorial and can easily be understood by a wide range of people including culturally and linguistically diverse communities. We partnered with the Citizens Advice Bureau to support our welfare registration and volunteers process in case of an emergency. We have identified over 45 buildings that could potentially be used as welfare assistance centres during an emergency event. These centres will provide assistance for people and animals in an emergency, for example food, accommodation and connecting to Work and Income. Lastly, we continue to provide welfare support for people during localised emergencies in Wellington.

Case study

Supporting student learning on graffiti vandalism

In 2013 we created a new position within Community Services – Graffiti Programme Advisor. This role’s responsibilities include devising and implementing a Graffiti Vandalism Management Plan. This plan would encourage collaboration with the Police and wider community to prevent acts of graffiti vandalism and interrupt its potential as a “gateway” crime.

In the first months of the plan’s development, the Graffiti Programme Advisor was contacted by the Head of Geography at Rongotai College. They asked if the Council would support their Year 12 class with a student-driven assignment to understand the geographic spatial pattern of graffiti vandalism within the Wellington urban area. The assignment would also contribute to overall NCEA marks for Level 2 Geography. With a commitment to taking a preventative approach (one of the four key pillars of the overall management plan), a partnership with the college began, which has continued every second school term since 2014.

This school term, the Council supported the students’ learning through a field day, which included meeting with Police and City Arts, and a walking tour through Wellington by the Inverlochy Art School to understand the difference between Council-commissioned graffiti art and graffiti vandalism.

In June, four students presented to the Community, Sport and Recreation Committee on behalf of the 40 Year 12 students involved. They told Councillors how they had used the history of graffiti alongside data provided via the Council’s Stop Tags database of graffiti hotspots to decipher for themselves the patterns and possible reasons for them. This inquiry-based learning encouraged the boys’ own critical thinking, which was spot on. As one student reported to the Committee: “We were able to pick Hine’s brain heaps and she was able to confirm our thoughts on why graffiti was in some places and not others.”

The partnership work with Rongotai College has also been documented within a teaching resource, “Geography in Focus”, a guide for issues-based learning co-authored by Louise Richards. The Council will continue to support this programme for as long as required, to help students better understand graffiti, the reasons it occurs and the impact it has on Wellington.

Our performance

Quality and usage of public health and safety services and programmes

Our response to urgent requests from the public, and the cleanliness and maintained state of our public toilets met or exceeded their targets. Our response rate to urgent requests exceeded our performance last year. We achieved our target for peak trading hour inspections of high risk premises although this figure declined from last year. Further detail can be found in the section ‘Measuring our Performance’.

Finances

How it was funded

Services in this activity are funded through a mixture of general rates and user charges.

What it cost 2015/16

Operating
Expenditure
($000)
Actual
2016
Budget
2016
Variance
2016
Actual
2015
5.3.1 Burials and Cremations        
Expenditure 1,626 1,648 22 2,310
Revenue (764) (803) (39) (816)
Net Expenditure 862 845 (17) 1,494
5.3.2 Public Toilets 1        
Expenditure 3,048 2,661 (387) 2,614
Revenue - - - -
Net Expenditure 3,048 2,661 (387) 2,614
5.3.3 Public Health Regulations        
Expenditure 5,188 5,276 88 4,675
Revenue (3,266) (3,211) 55 (3,089)
Net Expenditure 1,922 2,065 143 1,586
5.3.4 City Safety        
Expenditure 2,791 2,674 (117) 2,234
Revenue (51) - 51 (46)
Net Expenditure 2,740 2,674 (66) 2,188
5.3.5 WREMO        
Expenditure 1,394 1,337 (57) 1,322
Revenue (20) (43) (23) (34)
Net Expenditure 1,374 1,294 (80) 1,288

Capital Expenditure ($000) Actual
2016
Budget*
2016
Variance
2016
Actual
2015
5.3.1 Burials and Cremations 2        
Expenditure 445 446 1 173
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward N/A 300 - N/A
5.3.2 Public Toilets 3        
Expenditure 295 295 - 865
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward N/A - - N/A
5.3.5 WREMO 4        
Expenditure 72 95 23 -
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward N/A - - N/A

* The capital expenditure budget consists of the LTP amount plus the carry forward from 2014/15.
1 Over budget due to higher depreciation costs.
2 Under budget due to delays in replacing the cremator at the Karori Cemetery.
3 Under budget due to delays in works on Hataitai softball and Kelburn park pavilions.
4 Under budget due to asset purchases being lower than expected.

Social and recreation – overall summary

Some progress was made in this activity area. Customer satisfaction with our housing services and facilities is high, as is utilisation of the ASB Sports Centre and pools. However, there is room for improvement – there have been a number of delays to capital projects and feedback on the usage of some of our facilities needs to be factored into future planning.

23WCC Parks and Recreation
24WCC City Housing
25WCC Residential Monitoring Survey