Statements of Service Provision

7 Transport
Waka

Delivering an efficient and safe transport system that connects people and spaces

BY THE NUMBERS

9,621 and 55,120

Number of cyclists and pedestrians entering the Central Business District during the week. This compares to 10,515 and 54,319 in 2014/15.

Transport – at a glance

Outcomes Connected-city People-centred city Eco-city Dynamic-city
Relevant LTP objectives

“Investing to grow” through establishing a programme of major projects that grow the economy and deliver returns on investment;

Investing to maintain and improve existing services, including making infrastructure more resilient and the city’s transport system more efficient;

Increasing the use of existing assets rather than spending on new infrastructure;

Improving asset management practices to better manage risk and the timing of asset replacement; and

Achieving ongoing efficiencies from shared services and improved customer experiences.

LTP key activities Transport. Parking.
Relevant LTP projects Better transport options; Vehicle network.
Operational expenditure Operational expenditure (as per financial summary).

The Council’s transport work includes transport planning, managing the city’s assets and network of roads, cycleways and walkways, managing parking in the city and promoting safety.

Our work is essential for people’s ability to interact with each other, and their enjoyment of the city and what it has to offer. It is necessary for the economy, the ability of businesses to reach their markets, and to promote collaboration and innovation.

7.1
Transport
Waka

We manage the transport network so it is sustainable, safe and efficient

What we do and why

Wellingtonians are the highest users of public transport in New Zealand and between 200,000 and 300,000 people use some form of the city’s transport network daily. Among other things, our transport network offers Wellingtonians bridges, tunnels, bus shelters and approximately 18,000 street lights.

An effective public transport network helps reduce congestion and the city’s carbon emissions. A high proportion of residents walk and cycle to work, thereby reducing private vehicle usage.

Our activities include:

These activities contribute to the following outcomes:

Outcome Outcome statement
People-centred city
  • The transport, vehicle, cycle, passenger transport, pedestrian, network control system and road safety activities provides people with accessible and safe transport choices, from their homes to shops, for work, recreation and pleasure
Connected-city
  • The transport, cycle, vehicle, pedestrian and network control system networks provide accessible and safe transport choices that connect people with each other and with places locally, nationally and internationally, including for commerce and trade
Eco-city
  • The transport, passenger transport, cycle, pedestrian networks and network control systems reflect our commitment to sustainable, safe and efficient transport choices
Dynamic-city
  • Our transport, passenger, pedestrian and cycle network that allows easy movement of people and goods is vital for business and a significant competitive advantage
  • The vehicle, passenger transport and cycle network provide for easy and affordable movement to and around the central city

Did you know?

We continued our ‘business as usual’ work which saw us:

  • Respond to over 37,250 requests for service in relation to drainage, street lighting, minor flooding, street and footpath cleaning, litter, recycling, minor maintenance to seats, bins and cycle racks, requests for new items as well as clearing berms, road side vegetation and slips
  • Renew over 22 kilometres of footpath, nearly 11.5 kilometres of kerb and channel and repair or replace nearly 7.5 kilometres of handrails and safety rails
  • Resurface 59.1 kilometres of road carriageway
  • In our capacity as the Road Controlling Authority we processed over 6,400 Corridor Access Requests and 3,700 Traffic Management Plans
  • Install, refurbish or repair approximately 250 seats, 175 litter bins, 30 bollards and 50 cycle racks
  • Along with nearly 70 kilometres of centrelines and broken yellow lines we replaced 53 accessibility park symbols, 70 pedestrian crossing diamonds, 750 cycling related road markings, 1,000 direction arrows and 300 ‘Give Way’ symbols

Our key achievements

We provided a transport, vehicle, cycle, passenger transport, and pedestrian network giving people accessible and safe transport choices, from their homes to shops, for work, recreation and pleasure

We carried out work in a number of areas in the city including:

In addition to the above we built new retaining walls in Khandallah, Horokiwi, Takapu Valley and Takarau Gorge, and renewed bridges or retaining walls in Karori, Ohariu Valley, Strathmore, Miramar, Johnsonville, Highbury and Brooklyn.

Through our CCO – Wellington Cable Car Ltd – we provided accessible and safe transport choices.

Wellington Cable Car Limited

The Wellington Cable Car Limited (WCCL) was formed in April 1991 in response to legislation that prevented a local authority from owning and operating the Cable Car as a transport activity.

Relevant Council outcomes

People-centred city The transport, vehicle, cycle, passenger transport and pedestrian networks, the network control system, and road safety activities provide people with accessible and safe transport choices, from their homes to shops, for work, recreation and pleasure

Key activities

  • The company owns and operates Wellington’s iconic Cable Car passenger service. Its passengers include local residents (commuters and students) and domestic and international visitors to Wellington. This operation is financed from passenger fare income and any additional revenue developed from WCCL and Wellington City Council tourism-related activities. Ongoing marketing initiatives are seen as a key part of the future success of the Cable Car. This also includes potential further investment in retail, merchandising and event hosting activities (such as weddings)
  • Trolley bus traction services by means of the overhead electrical network for use by Trolley Buses in Wellington are provided under contract from GWRC, using Broadspectrum (rebranded name for Transfield Services Limited) as the maintenance services provider. This operation is financed from payments by GWRC on a cost recovery basis, to cover planned maintenance, reactive defect rectification and progressive replacement of severely degraded sections of the overhead electrical network. This also includes:
    • Infrastructure-related activities undertaken within Wellington on a profit-making basis, namely:
      • Projects initiated by parties other than GWRC requiring the overhead electrical network to be relocated and/or modified (for example, the Victoria University Pipitea campus construction project
      • Protection of the trolley bus overhead electrical network from damage by escorting high loads through the city and protection of parties requiring safe access in proximity to overhead lines by electrical de-energisation
    • Maintaining WCCL’s pole network funded via a combination of support from GWRC and pole user charges from telecommunications companies using WCCL’s poles to support their broadband networks

Key achievements

The transport, vehicle, cycle, passenger transport and pedestrian networks, the network control system, and road safety activities provide people with accessible and safe transport choices, from their homes to shops, for work, recreation and pleasure
  • The Cable Car earned a record high total revenue for the year
  • The trolley bus traction services division completed the roll-out of the Trolley Bus overhead protection project and the decommissioning of the Hataitai Loop

2015/16 Financial Information

Operational Grant: nil
Capital Grants: $1,509,011 for the cable car electric drive replacement project

Interesting Fact 2015/16 Actual Performance 2015/16 Target
Total Passengers 1,044,804
Improved performance
1,010,905
2014/15 Performance
976,416

Source: Wellington Cable Car Ltd

We provided a transport, cycle, vehicle and pedestrian network giving accessible and safe transport choices that connect people with each other and with places locally, nationally and internationally, including for commerce and trade

We undertook improvements work on a major section of road in Johnsonville – the Johnsonville Triangle Upgrade. This project means less traffic congestion in the town centre and reduced peak-hour queues on the State Highway 1 off-ramp. It provides safe and easy walking and cycling routes, more reliable bus journey times, and boosted the local economy by encouraging commercial and residential growth. The upgrade also sets the scene for rejuvenation of the Johnsonville Mall.

The work included: a two-lane off-ramp from State Highway 1; new traffic lights at Fraser Avenue and Gothic Street; additional pedestrian crossings and facilities; replacing the Broderick Road / Moorefield Road bridge over the railway lines with a longer and wider bridge to allow for cycle lanes and future train options, and cycle lanes and a path for cyclists and pedestrians to by-pass the two northern roundabouts and connect local schools.

It also provided options for better bus flow around the Johnsonville triangle (Johnsonville, Moorefield, Broderick roads), and the installation of a new bus shelter at the stop in the mall. Broderick and Johnsonville roads were resurfaced in March/April 2016.

To ensure a safe and resilient transport network we strengthened the Hataitai Bus Tunnel and Aotea Quay Bridge portals. We also replaced the joints on the northbound lane of the Aotea Quay Bridge.

We undertook work to ensure our pedestrian and cycle networks reflects our commitment to sustainable, safe and efficient transport choices

WCUCP aims to create a sustainable, liveable and attractive city, offering choices about how to travel, with an appealing cycle network that encourages people of all ages and abilities to cycle. The WCUCP was adopted in September 2015 and extends to Ngauranga, central city, eastern suburbs, and Island Bay. The method and level of community engagement on the Island Bay cycleway resulted in significant unease that impacted on other projects in the WCUCP, and confidence in Council’s ability to deliver the WCUCP. A review of the WCUCP commissioned by New Zealand Transport Authority (NZTA) made a series of recommendations for change. Working with NZTA we are refreshing the cycle way programme and our engagement process with the community.

We replaced 12 old poles and street lights in Cuba Mall (between Ghuznee and Dixon Streets) with seven brighter and more energy efficient LEDs. The seven new poles were repositioned to reduce the impact on pedestrians, businesses and footpath use. The LEDs are more energy efficient and improve the level of lighting. Replacement poles were also lower which reduced light pollution and improved the streets amenity - the poles no longer protruded past the visual canopy of the trees. Our residents are less satisfied with street lighting and we are below our targets.

Measure 2015/16 Actual Performance 2015/16 Target
Residents satisfied with street lighting in central city and suburbs Central City 78%
Suburban Areas 54%
Did not achieve
Central City 85%
Suburban Areas 75%
2014/15 Performance
Central City 80%
Suburban Areas 55%

Source: WCC Residents’ Monitoring Survey 2016

We supported 10 projects with $29,220 through the Communities on Bikes Fund which included a range of projects which promote cycling as a mode of transport such as Frocks on Bikes (A la Carless) and Lucid Dream Bikes (Bicycle festival of lights and motion). Three schools received funding for Bikes in School Tracks - Hampton Hill School, Amesbury School and Houghton Valley School.

In addition, to better integrate our transport network with our urban spaces we obtained an exemption for the NZTA Road Traffic Rules so we could add key city personalities to our pedestrian crossing signals. As a result we have a silhouette of Kate Sheppard installed around Parliament and the Railway Station, a local celebrity Carmen Rupe in the Cuba Mall area and pioneering businessman John Plimmer in Lambton Quay around Plimmer Steps and Featherston Street.

Our performance

Quality and timeliness of transport infrastructure and services: Whilst we achieved our level of service standards, we failed to meet our target for the percent of residents who consider roads and footpaths good or very good. This reflects re-prioritisation of maintenance/ renewal work and a decline in levels of service over a contract transitional period. We failed to meet our response rate target for urgent and non-urgent work but our levels of service for urgent responses are the same as last year. The percentage of our major roads that meet national street lighting standards was below target. In each of the above measures there were minor variations in our performance from last year. Our resident’s satisfaction with street lighting in the city and suburbs was below our target and our performance last year. We exceeded our target for the percentage of roads that meet compulsory smooth roads standards, although our performance was lower than last year. This is likely to be a result of activities such as the installation of telecommunication services in our roads and changing road maintenance priorities.

Further detail can be found in the section titled ‘Measuring our Performance’.

Finances

How it was funded

Services in this activity are funded through a mixture of general rates, fees and charges and grants and subsidies received from NZTA for transport related activities.

What it cost 2015/16

Operating
Expenditure
($000)
Actual
2016
Budget
2016
Variance
2016
Actual
2015
7.1.1 Transport Planning 1        
Expenditure 1,412 1,144 (268) 1,309
Revenue (153) (86) 67 (132)
Net Expenditure 1,259 1,058 (201) 1,177
7.1.2 Vehicle network 2        
Expenditure 22,408 22,645 237 21,579
Revenue (4,830) (1,322) 3,508 (3,594)
Net Expenditure 17,578 21,323 3,745 17,985
7.1.3 Cycle network 3        
Expenditure 1,291 1,660 369 705
Revenue (263) (36) 227 (8)
Net Expenditure 1,028 1,624 596 697
7.1.4 Passenger transport network 4        
Expenditure 2,632 1,721 (911) 1,260
Revenue (922) (951) (29) (1,057)
Net Expenditure 1,710 770 (940) 203
7.1.5 Pedestrian network 5        
Expenditure 6,303 6,548 245 6,027
Revenue (144) (39) 105 (57)
Net Expenditure 6,159 6,509 350 5,970
7.1.6 Network-wide control and management 6        
Expenditure 6,658 6,799 141 6,356
Revenue (2,346) (2,055) 291 (2,057)
Net Expenditure 4,312 4,744 432 4,299
7.1.7 Road safety 7        
Expenditure 5,924 6,095 171 6,303
Revenue (1,671) (1,601) 70 (1,747)
Net Expenditure 4,253 4,494 241 4,556

Capital Expenditure ($000) Actual
2016
Budget*
2016
Variance
2016
Actual
2015
7.1.2 Vehicle network 8        
Expenditure 22,319 23,399 80 29,895
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward N/A 2,111 - N/A
7.1.3 Cycle network 9        
Expenditure 3,288 3,289 1 2,428
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward N/A 2,384 - N/A
7.1.4 Passenger transport network 10        
Expenditure 368 (369) (737) 123
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward N/A 514 - N/A
7.1.5 Pedestrian network 11        
Expenditure 3,966 4,225 259 3,746
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward N/A 355 - N/A
7.1.6 Network-wide control and management 12        
Expenditure 2,536 2,772 236 2,397
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward N/A 32 - N/A
7.1.7 Road safety 13        
Expenditure 2,715 2,412 (303) 2,803
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward N/A 39 - N/A

* The capital expenditure budget consists of the LTP amount plus the carry forward from 2014/15.
1 Over budget due to higher labour costs and unplanned legal expenses.
2 Under budget due to vested assets revenue and savings on depreciation, following the revaluation of infrastructure assets.
3 Under budget due to underspending on cycleways planning (delays) and savings in depreciation.
4 Over budget due to the upgrade of the Cable Car electric drive unit (not in the LTP budget however subsequently approved during the year). This is partially offset by higher bus shelter income (digital advertising, savings on other grant costs and reduced maintenance due to bus stop signs and shelter maintenance now with GWRC.
5 Under budget due to vested asset income and savings on depreciation following revaluation of infrastructure assets.
6 Under budget due to higher income in network activity and lower costs on road markings maintenance.
7 Under budget due to reduced labour costs and some increased income in the street lighting area.
8 Under budget due to the Southern Corridor road maintenance contractor not completing all of the work programme. In addition there is an underspend of $1.1m identified for the Northland Tunnel project.
9 Under budget due to limited works in the Central area and none undertaken in the eastern area. Projects will need to wait until the outcome of the “Let’s get Wellington moving” project.
10 Over budget due to additional consulting costs associated with the Ngauranga to Airport quick wins programme. NB. Funding for this work was not in the LTP budget however was subsequently approved.
11 The under spend is due to the Southern Corridor maintenance contractor not completing all of the work programme.
12 The under spend is due to the Southern Corridor maintenance contractor not completing all of the work programme in traffic and street signs renewals.
13 Over budget due to the civil works component of the Cuba Mall lighting renewal project being greater than planned, a higher incidence of light pole failures and higher labour costs.

7.2
Parking
Ratonga tūnga waka
Top

Parking in the CBD is important for shoppers, tourists, and those working in and visiting the city

What we do and why

We provide around 10% of the parking in central Wellington. This consists of approximately 12,000 on-street parking spaces, of which 3,500 are in the central business district, along with some off-street parking and street spaces for taxis, couriers, people with disabilities, bus stops and diplomatic services. We also manage off-street parking at Clifton Terrace, the Michael Fowler Centre and beneath Civic Square.

Over the year these activities contribute to the following outcome:

Outcome Outcome statement
People-centred city
  • Central city car and motorbike parking is important for shoppers, workers, visitors, and people visiting the city for recreation activities
  • Parking also allows goods to be picked up and delivered throughout the city
  • Parking helps make Wellington a liveable prosperous city

Our key achievements

We have undertaken a variety of work to provide parking for shoppers, workers, visitors, and people visiting the city for recreation activities

We have continued to update our parking technology and access to parking services to help visitors to the city. Improvements include installation of parking sensors, improved payment methods, and an on-line permit application service.

Measure 2015/16 Actual Performance 2015/16 Target
On street car parking average occupancy 78%
Improved performance
75%
2014/15 Performance
80%

Source: WCC Parking Services

Our Parking Services Team continued to play an important role in large scale city events and community driven initiatives. Events in the 2015/16 year included Newtown Festival, Round the Bays, CubaDupa, Anzac Parade, and All Blacks tests. Our focus is to maintain a balance between ambassadorial work at on-street events, and enforcement requirements, whilst ensuring the safe movement of vehicles and pedestrians throughout the city. We also assisted residents’ use of the city by processing in excess of 10,000 service requests from members of the public requiring a Parking Officers support. We issued approximately 4,500 residents parking permits and in excess of 2,000 other general parking permits.

Measure 2015/16 Actual Performance 2015/16 Target
Percentage of residents perceptions that parking enforcement is fair 48%
Did not achieve
Increase on previous year
2014/15 Performance
50%

Source: WCC Residents’ Monitoring Survey

We strengthened our relationships with the NZTA and New Zealand Police. This collaborative effort focussed on addressing both driver and parking behaviours through joint operations in hot spots throughout the CBD.

Our performance

Quality of parking provision: Turnover rates for on-street parking were below our target and last year’s performance largely due to an increase in parking demand. Fewer of our residents perceive parking enforcement as fair. Further detail can be found in the section ‘Measuring our Performance’.

Finances

How it was funded

Services in this activity are funded through a mixture of general rates, fees and user charges.

What it cost 2015/16

Operating
Expenditure
($000)
Actual
2016
Budget
2016
Variance
2016
Actual
2015
7.2.1 Parking        
Expenditure 12,262 13,404 1,142 11,218
Revenue (26,442) (27,455) (1,013) (25,642)
Net Revenue (14,180) (14,051) 129 (14,424)
Capital Expenditure ($000) Actual
2016
Budget*
2016
Variance
2016
Actual
2015
7.2.1 Parking        
Expenditure 1,342 1,389 47 89
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward N/A 60   N/A

* The capital expenditure budget consists of the LTP amount plus the carry forward from 2014/15.

Transport – overall summary

Despite community concern and delays over our cycleway project, progress was made towards this activity area. However, residents have concerns with the condition of roads and footpaths, street lighting in suburban areas and the re-surfacing of local roads. Some of our capital projects were either under budget due to delays or budget underestimates. Some of this is because of factors we have no control over e.g. electricity network failures. Improvements to this important area will allow us to better achieve our outcomes in the future.